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The inaugural Nano Research Young Innovators (NR45) Award in nanobiotechnology

Zhen Gu1,2 (*) and Hongjie Dai3 (*)

1 Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
2 California NanoSystems Institute (CNSI), Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Center for Minimally Invasive Therapeutics, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
3 Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-018-2208-4

Nano Research 2018, 11(10): 4931每4935

Address correspondence to Zhen Gu, guzhen@ucla.edu; Hongjie Dai, hdai1@stanford.edu

    

Inorganic nanoparticles and the microbiome

Kunyu Qiu, Phillip G. Durham, and Aaron C. Anselmo (*)

Division of Pharmacoengineering and Molecular Pharmaceutics, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
Kunyu Qiu and Phillip G. Durham contributed equally to this work.

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-018-2137-2

Nano Research 2018, 11(10): 4936每4954

Address correspondence to aanselmo@email.unc.edu

The human microbiota is routinely exposed to the inorganic nanoparticles present in consumer goods such as clothing, sunscreen, toothpaste, and foods. Here, we review current literature describing the effect of exposure to inorganic nanoparticles on the microbiome.

    

Scavenging of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species with nanomaterials

Carolina A. Ferreira, Dalong Ni (*), Zachary T. Rosenkrans, and Weibo Cai (*)

Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53705, USA

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-018-2092-y

Nano Research 2018, 11(10): 4955每4984

Address correspondence to Dalong Ni, dni2@wisc.edu; Weibo Cai, wcai@uwhealth.org

Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species are implicated in various diseases. Herein, we review the intrinsic antioxidant properties, radical-scavenging mechanisms, and in vivo applications of several types of nanoparticles.

    

Strategies to improve micelle stability for drug delivery

Yang Lu, Ershuai Zhang, Jianhai Yang, and Zhiqiang Cao (*)
Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Wayne State University, Detroit 48202, MI, USA

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-018-2152-3

Nano Research 2018, 11(10): 4985每4998

Address correspondence to zcao@wayne.edu

Different strategies to improve micelle stability were reviewed in this work. Specific examples with improved drug delivery efficacy owing to enhanced micelle stability were illustrated.

    

Advances in targeted nanotherapeutics: From bioconjugation to biomimicry

Danielle M. Valcourt1, Jenna Harris2, Rachel S. Riley1, Megan Dang1, Jianxin Wang1, and Emily S. Day1,2,3 (*)

1 161 Colburn Lab, Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716, USA
2 201 DuPont Hall, Department of Materials Science & Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716, USA
3 4701 Ogletown Stanton Road, Helen F. Graham Cancer Center & Research Institute, Newark, DE 19713, USA

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-018-2083-z

Nano Research 2018, 11(10): 4999每5016

Address correspondence to emilyday@udel.edu

This review provides insight into the benefits and limitations of two types of targeted nanoparticle systems under investigation for cancer therapy: bioconjugated nanoparticles and biomimetic nanoparticles.

    

Multifunctional nucleic acid nanostructures for gene therapies

Jianbing Liu1, Zhengang Wang1, Shuai Zhao1,2, and Baoquan Ding1,2 (*)

1 CAS Key Laboratory of Nanosystem and Hierarchical Fabrication, CAS Center for Excellence in Nanoscience, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, Beijing 100190, China
2 University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-018-2093-x

Nano Research 2018, 11(10): 5017每5027

Address correspondence to dingbq@nanoctr.cn

Nucleic acid nanostructures have been rationally designed as delivery vehicles for gene therapies based on RNA interference, CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing, gene expression, or CpG-based immunostimulation.

    

In situ polymerization on biomacromolecules for nanomedicines

Xiangqian Jia, Luyao Wang, and Juanjuan Du (*)

School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-018-2080-2

Nano Research 2018, 11(10): 5028每5048

Address correspondence to dusps@tsinghua.edu.cn

While holding vast promise for the treatment of many disorders, biopharmaceuticals still face critical challenges. In situ polymerization provides an appealing and promising platform to improve the pharmacological characteristics of biopharmaceuticals.

    

Biomedical applications of magneto-responsive scaffolds

Adedokun A. Adedoyin and Adam K. Ekenseair (*)

Department of Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115-5000, USA

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-018-2198-2

Nano Research 2018, 11(10): 5049每5064

Address correspondence to a.ekenseair@neu.edu

This review paper highlights the theory,fabrication and increasing use of magnetic nanoparticles to create biomaterials that are responsive to external magnetic fields for applications in drug delivery, tissue regeneration and artificial muscles.

    

Nano functional neural interfaces

Yongchen Wang1,∫, Hanlin Zhu2,∫, Huiran Yang3,4,∫, Aaron D. Argall5, Lan Luan2, Chong Xie2 (*), and Liang Guo3,6 (*)

1 Department of Biomedical Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus 43210, USA
2 Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin 78712, USA
3 Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus 43210, USA
4 Key Laboratory of Flexible Electronics and Institute of Advanced Materials, Jiangsu National Synergetic Innovation Center for Advanced Materials, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816, China
5 Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program, The Ohio State University, Columbus 43210, USA
6 Department of Neuroscience, The Ohio State University, Columbus 43210, USA
Yongchen Wang, Hanlin Zhu and Huiran Yang contributed equally to this work.

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-018-2127-4

Nano Research 2018, 11(10): 5065每5106

Address correspondence to Liang Guo, guo.725@osu.edu; Chong Xie, chongxie@utexas.edu

Engineered functional neural interfaces serve as essential abiotic每biotic transducers between an engineered system and the nervous system. This review covers the exciting developments and applications of functional neural interfaces that rely on nanoelectrodes, nanotransducers, or bionanotransducers to establish an interface with the nervous system.

    

Plenty more room on the glass bottom: Surface functionalization and nanobiotechnology for cell isolation

Ali Ansari1 (*) and P. I. Imoukhuede2 (*)

1 Bioengineering Department, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA
2 Biomedical Engineering Department, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63130, USA

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-018-2177-7

Nano Research 2018, 11(10): 5107每5129

Address correspondence to Ali Ansari, aansari2@illinois.edu; P. I. Imoukhuede, imoukhuede@wustl.edu

Modifying surfaces using surface functionalization has recently become much more commonplace, as it enables adaptive or responsive surfaces to be created for more complex testing modalities and biological applications. In this review, we discuss the many applications of surface functionalization techniques to both cell capture and cell isolation modalities, to provide expand the toolset for researchers who would like to adopt them.

    

High-density lipoprotein mimetic nanotherapeutics for cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases

Song Ih Ahn1,2,∫, Hyun-Ji Park1,∫, Jiwon Yom1,2, Taeyoung Kim1, and Yong Tae Kim1,2,3,4 (*)

1 George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA
2 Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA
3 Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA
4 Institute for Electronics and Nanotechnology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA
Song Ih Ahn and Hyun-Ji Park contributed equally to this work.

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-018-2101-1

Nano Research 2018, 11(10): 5130每5143

Address correspondence to ytkim@gatech.edu

This review introduces the heterogeneous characteristics and biological functions of high-density lipoproteins (HDLs), highlights the current representative applications of HDL mimetic nanotherapeutics for cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases, and discusses the current challenges and future perspective.

    

Advances in nanomaterials for brain microscopy

Jackson T. Del Bonis-O*Donnell1, Linda Chio1, Gabriel F. Dorlhiac2, Ian R. McFarlane1, and Markita P. Landry1,3,4,5 (*)
1 Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
2 Biophysics Graduate Group, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
3 Innovative Genomics Institute (IGI), Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
4 California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences, QB3, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
5 Chan-Zuckerberg Biohub, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-018-2145-2

Nano Research 2018, 11(10): 5144每5172

Address correspondence to landry@berkeley.edu

Nanomaterials are providing new insights into the structure and function of the brain. In this review, we summarize the different techniques used in optical microscopy and discuss recent advances in nanomaterials, which are enabling new methods for visualizing the living brain.

    

Development of mRNA vaccines and their prophylactic and therapeutic applications

Kyuri Lee, Minjeong Kim, Yunmi Seo, and Hyukjin Lee (*)

College of Pharmacy, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 13760, Republic of Korea
Kyuri Lee and Minjeong Kim contributed equally to this work.

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-018-2095-8

Nano Research 2018, 11(10): 5173每5192

Address correspondence to hyukjin@ewha.ac.kr

In this article, the recent progresses of messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccines for applications in prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines are explained. It provides an overview of two types of mRNA vaccines (conventional mRNA vaccines, self-amplifying mRNA vaccines) and their prophylactic applications to prevent future virus infections. In addition, therapeutic applications of mRNA vaccines in cancer immunotherapy are described with a brief introduction to cancer immunotherapy.

    

Current taxane formulations and emerging cabazitaxel delivery systems

Boyang Sun1,2, Robert M. Straubinger3, and Jonathan F. Lovell1,2 (*)

1 Department of Biomedical Engineering, University at Buffalo, State University of New York. Buffalo, NY 14260, USA
2 Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University at Buffalo, State University of New York. Buffalo, NY 14260, USA
3 Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University at Buffalo, State University of New York. Buffalo, NY 14214, USA

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-018-2171-0

Nano Research 2018, 11(10): 5193每5218

Address correspondence to jflovell@buffalo.edu

Although first-generation taxanes (i.e. paclitaxel and docetaxel) have sparked broad interest in a variety of promising delivery vehicles, fewer have yet been developed for cabazitaxel, second generation taxane. This review summarizes several clinical-stage approaches for taxane formulation, and recent efforts to develop novel cabazitaxel delivery systems.

    

Functionalization of silica nanoparticles for nucleic acid delivery

Rimpei Kamegawa1, Mitsuru Naito2, and Kanjiro Miyata1 (*)

1 Department of Materials Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656, Japan
2 Center for Disease Biology and Integrative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-018-2116-7

Nano Research 2018, 11(10): 5219每5239

Address correspondence to miyata@bmw.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp

This review discusses the functionalization and performance of silica nanoparticles for nucleic acid delivery with respect to loading and programmed release of nucleic acids, active targeting, endosome escape, and biocompatibility.

    

Cell-based drug delivery systems for biomedical applications

Teng Li, He Dong, Can Zhang (*), and Ran Mo (*)

State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Drug Discovery for Metabolic Diseases, Center of Advanced Pharmaceuticals and Biomaterials, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009, China

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-018-2179-5

Nano Research 2018, 11(10): 5240每5257

Address correspondence to Ran Mo, rmo@cpu.edu.cn; Can Zhang, zhangcan@cpu.edu.cn

This review presents recent advances in biomedical applications of cell-based drug delivery systems with a focus on drug delivery, tissue engineering,bioimaging,and disease treatment.

    

Development of optical nanoprobes for molecular imaging of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species

Xu Zhen and Kanyi Pu (*)

School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637457, Singapore

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-018-2135-4

Nano Research 2018, 11(10): 5258每5280

Address correspondence to kypu@ntu.edu.sg

    

Biomedical applications of mRNA nanomedicine

Qingqing Xiong1,2, Gha Young Lee1, Jianxun Ding1, Wenliang Li1,3, and Jinjun Shi1 (*)

1 Center for Nanomedicine and Department of Anesthesiology, Brigham and Women*s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
2 Department of Hepatobiliary Cancer, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute & Hospital, Tianjin 300060, China
3 School of Pharmacy, Jilin Medical University, Jilin 132013, China

 

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-018-2146-1

Nano Research 2018, 11(10): 5281每5309

Address correspondence to jshi@bwh.harvard.edu

Along with the development of chemical modification strategies and nanotechnology delivery platforms, mRNA nanomedicine has recently shown increasingly widespread biomedical applications including vaccination, protein-replacement therapy, gene editing, and cellular reprogramming and engineering.

    

Design of synthetic materials for intracellular delivery of RNAs:From siRNA-mediated gene silencing to CRISPR/Cas gene editing

Jason B. Miller1,2 and Daniel J. Siegwart1,2 (*)

1 Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, 75390, USA
2 Department of Biochemistry, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, 75390, USA

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-018-2099-4

Nano Research 2018, 11(10): 5310每5337

Address correspondence to daniel.siegwart@utsouthwestern.edu

This review describes the design of synthetic nanomaterials with clinical utility to deliver RNA cargos including small RNA (siRNA/ miRNA), messenger RNA, and RNAs for non-viral CRISPR/Cas gene editing.

    

Recent advances in mRNA vaccine delivery

Lu Tan and Xun Sun (*)

Key Laboratory of Drug Targeting and Novel Drug Delivery System, Ministry of Education, West China School of Pharmacy, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-018-2091-z

Nano Research 2018, 11(10): 5338每5354

Address correspondence to sunxun@scu.edu.cn

Appropriate delivery systems can improve the limited stability, poor translation efficiency, and cell targeting of messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccines.

    

Cadmium nanoclusters in a protein matrix: Synthesis, characterization, and application in targeted drug delivery and cellular imaging

Morteza Sarparast1,∫, Abolhassan Noori1,∫, Hoda Ilkhani1, S. Zahra Bathaie2, Maher F. El-Kady3,4, Lisa J. Wang3, Huong Pham3, Kristofer L. Marsh3, Richard B. Kaner3,5 (*), and Mir F. Mousavi1,3 (*)

1 Department of Chemistry, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran 14115-175, Iran
2 Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran 14115-111, Iran
3 Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
4 Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza 12613, Egypt
5 California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
These authors contributed equally to this work.

DOI 10.1007/s12274-016-1201-z

Nano Research 2016, 9(11): 3229每3246

Address correspondence to Richard B. Kaner, kaner@chem.ucla.edu; Mir F. Mousavi, mousavim@modares.ac.ir

Bovine serum albumin-templated Cd nanoclusters were designed as a theranostic nanoplatform for simultaneous cellular imaging and targeted drug delivery. In vitro experiments demonstrated cellular uptake, hyaluronic acid-directed breast cancer cell targeting, and pHinduced yet sustained doxorubicin release and cancer cell apoptosis.

    

Engineering cancer vaccines using stimuli-responsive biomaterials

Yu Zhao1, Yugang Guo1, and Li Tang1,2 (*)

1 Institute of Bioengineering, École polytechnique f谷d谷rale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne, CH-1015, Switzerland
2 Institute of Materials Science & Engineering, École polytechnique f谷d谷rale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne, CH-1015, Switzerland

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-018-2162-1

Nano Research 2018, 11(10): 5355每5371

Address correspondence to li.tang@epfl.ch

This mini review article summarizes the recent advances in applying stimuli-responsive biomaterials for cancer vaccine delivery. Various stimuli-responsive cancer vaccines for enhanced lymph node targeting and antigen cross-presentation are reviewed and discussed.

    

Nanobiotechnology: 1D nanomaterial building blocks for cellular interfaces and hybrid tissues

Haitao Liu1,2,∫, Bilal Haider1,∫, Holden R. Fried1,∫, Jie Ju1, Olurotimi Bolonduro1, Vineeth Raghuram1, and Brian P. Timko1 (*)

1 Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts 02155, USA
2 School of Materials Science and Technology, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083, China
Haitao Liu, Bilal Haider and Holden R. Fried contributed equally to this work.

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-018-2189-3

Nano Research 2018, 11(10): 5372每5399

Address correspondence to brian.timko@tufts.edu

We review one-dimensional (1D) nanomaterials and how they interface with biological systems at various levels of complexity to modulate or monitor cellular function and achieve hybrid tissues.

    

Temperature-responsive polymers: Synthesis, properties, and biomedical applications

Shenglin Qiao1,2 and Hao Wang1,2 (*)

1 CAS Center for Excellence in Nanoscience, CAS Key Laboratory for Biomedical Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology (NCNST), Beijing 100190, China
2 University of Chinese Academy of Sciences (UCAS), Beijing 100049, China

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-018-2121-x

Nano Research 2018, 11(10): 5400每5423

Address correspondence to wanghao@nanoctr.cn

Here, we review the conventional and recently developed polymerization techniques employed for preparing temperatureresponsive polymers, summarize various parameters that influence the phase transition behavior of the polymers, and finally demonstrate the potential applications of biocompatible temperature-responsive polymers in the biomedical field.

    

Phototriggered targeting of nanocarriers for drug delivery

Yafei Li1,2, Yaming Zhang1,2, and Weiping Wang1,2 (*)

1 Dr. Li Dak-Sum Research Centre, The University of Hong Kong-Karolinska Institutet Collaboration in Regenerative Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China
2 Department of Pharmacology and Pharmacy, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-018-2132-7

Nano Research 2018, 11(10): 5424每5438

Address correspondence to wangwp@hku.hk

Enhanced targeted drug delivery can be achieved through phototriggered targeting by three mechanisms: targeting ligand activation, particle size reduction,and blood vessel disruption.

    

Plasmonic molecular assays: Recent advances and applications for mobile health

Tao Yu and Qingshan Wei (*)

Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, North Carolina State University, 911 Partners Way, Campus Box 7905, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-018-2094-9

Nano Research 2018, 11(10): 5439每5473

Address correspondence to qwei3@ncsu.edu

This thematic article of Nano Research highlights recent progress in plasmonics-enhanced molecular assays based on the interplay of surface plasmons with various biological species, as well as the applications of these assays in point-of-care diagnostics.

    

Nanoformulation of metal complexes: Intelligent stimuliresponsive platforms for precision therapeutics

Ming Hu1, Xiangzhao Ai1, Zhimin Wang1, Zhijun Zhang1, Haolun Cheong1, Wenmin Zhang1,2, Jun Lin3, Juan Li2, Huanghao Yang2, and Bengang Xing1,2 (*)

1 Division of Chemistry & Biological Chemistry, School of Physical & Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637371
2 College of Chemistry, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350116, China
3 State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022, China

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-018-2138-1

Nano Research 2018, 11(10): 5474每5498

Address correspondence to Bengang@ntu.edu.sg

Nanoformulation of metal complexes involves designing of intelligent platforms that respond to environmental stimuli (e.g., pH-gradient, redox conditions, enzyme activation, light irradiation, and magnetic field manipulation) for obtaining precision therapeutics.

    

Recent progress in background-free latent fingerprint imaging

Yingqian Wang, Jie Wang, Qinqin Ma, Zhihao Li, and Quan Yuan (*)

Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Biology and Medicine (Ministry of Education), College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072, China

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-018-2073-1

Nano Research 2018, 11(10): 5499每5518

Address correspondence to yuanquan@whu.edu.cn

    

PEGylation of therapeutic oligonucletides: From linear to highly branched PEG architectures

Xueguang Lu and Ke Zhang (*)

Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-018-2131-8

Nano Research 2018, 11(10): 5519每5534

Address correspondence to k.zhang@northeastern.edu

We review recent developments in PEGylated oligonucleotides for therapeutic applications, with a focus on comparing the strengths and limitations of different poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) architectures.

    

Delivery systems for theranostics in neurodegenerative diseases

Yan Li1, Ruiyuan Liu1,2, Weihong Ji1,2, Yanhui Li1, Linying Liu1,2, and Xin Zhang1 (*)

1 State Key Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China
2 University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-018-2067-z

Nano Research 2018, 11(10): 5535每5555

Address correspondence to xzhang@ipe.ac.cn

This review describes the recent progress in delivery systems, including the use of lipid nanoparticles, polymeric nanoparticles, inorganic nanoparticles,and exosomes for theranostics in neurodegenerative diseases.

    

Reversible hydrogels with tunable mechanical properties for optically controlling cell migration

Xin Wu1,∫, Wenmao Huang1,∫, Wen-Hao Wu2,∫, Bin Xue1, Dongfang Xiang1, Ying Li3, Meng Qin1, Fei Sun4, Wei Wang1 (*), Wen-Bin Zhang2 (*), and Yi Cao1 (*)

1 Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructure, and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093, China
2 Key Laboratory of Polymer Chemistry & Physics of Ministry of Education, Center for Soft Matter Science and Engineering, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China
3 Collaborative Innovation Center of Atmospheric Environment and Equipment Technology, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Information Science & Technology, Nanjing 210044, China
4 Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Division of BioMedical Engineering, and Center for Systems Biology & Human Health, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China
Xin Wu, Wenmao Huang and Wenhao Wu contributed equally to this work.

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-017-1890-y

Nano Research 2018, 11(10): 5556每5565

Address correspondence to Wei Wang, wangwei@nju.edu.cn; Wen-Bin Zhang, wenbin@pku.edu.cn; Yi Cao, caoyi@nju.edu.cn

Photo-responsive hydrogels with spatiotemporally tunable mechanical properties were engineered through light controllable association/ dissociation of the fluorescent protein Dronpa145N. Such hydrogels, with programmable mechanical history and spatial distribution, may serve as an ideal model system to better understand complex cellular functions.

    

Self-assembly of Human Galectin-1 via dual supramolecular interactions and its inhibition of T-cell agglutination and apoptosis

Wenjing Qi1, Yufei Zhang1, Zdravko Kochovski2, Jue Wang1, Yan Lu2,3, Guosong Chen1 (*), and Ming Jiang1

1 The State Key Laboratory of Molecular Engineering of Polymers and Department of Macromolecular Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200438, China
2 Soft Matter and Functional Materials, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin f邦r Materialien und Energie, Berlin 14109, Germany
3 Institute of Chemistry, University of Potsdam, 14476 Potsdam, Germany

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-018-2169-7

Nano Research 2018, 11(10): 5566每5572

Address correspondence to guosong@fudan.edu.cn

    

Cell membrane coating for reducing nanoparticle-induced inflammatory responses to scaffold constructs

Zhiyuan Fan1,∫, Peter Y. Li1,∫, Junjie Deng1,2, Stephen C. Bady1, and Hao Cheng1 (*)

1 Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA
2 Engineering Research Center of Clinical Functional Materials and Diagnosis & Treatment Devices of Zhejiang Province, Wenzhou Institute of Biomaterials and Engineering, CAS, Wenzhou 325011, China
Zhiyuan Fan and Peter Y. Li contributed equally to this work.

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-018-2084-y

Nano Research 2018, 11(10): 5573每5583

Address correspondence to hcheng@drexel.edu

Incorporation of therapeutic-releasing nanoparticles into biomaterial scaffolds has broad applications in tissue regeneration and immune modulation, but may induce excessive inflammatory and foreign body responses to scaffold constructs, limiting their applications. We report a new strategy to harness the natural biocompatibility of cell membranes to eliminate acute inflammatory responses by coating nanoparticle surfaces with red blood cell membranes.

    

Design and in vivo characterization of kidney-targeting multimodal micelles for renal drug delivery

Jonathan Wang1, Christopher Poon1, Deborah Chin1, Sarah Milkowski1, Vivian Lu1, Kenneth R. Hallows2,3, and Eun Ji Chung1,2,4,5,6 (*)

1 Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089, USA
2 Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Department of Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA
3 USC/UKRO Kidney Research Center, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA
4 Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA
5 Department of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA
6 Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089, USA

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-018-2100-2

Nano Research 2018, 11(10): 5584每5595

Address correspondence to eunchung@usc.edu

Kidney-targeting multimodal micelles demonstrate enhanced accumulation compared to untargeted controls. Analysis of nanoparticle distribution show tubular cell colocalization within the nephron of the kidney.

    

Co-delivery of mRNA and SPIONs through amino-ester nanomaterials

Xiao Luo1, Weiyu Zhao1, Bin Li1, Xinfu Zhang1, Chengxiang Zhang1, Anna Bratasz2, Binbin Deng3, David W. McComb3, and Yizhou Dong1,4,5,6,7,8 (*)

1 Division of Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA
2 Small Animal Imaging Core, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA
3 Center for Electron Microscopy and Analysis, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA
4 Department of Biomedical Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA
5 The Center for Clinical and Translational Science, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA
6 The Comprehensive Cancer Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA
7 Dorothy M. Davis Heart & Lung Research Institute, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA
8 Department of Radiation Oncology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-018-2082-0

Nano Research 2018, 11(10): 5596每5603

Address correspondence to dong.525@osu.edu

Messenger RNA (mRNA) and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) were co-encapsulated into amino-ester nanomaterials,which displayed dual functions both in vitro and in vivo.

    

Flexible and biocompatible nanopaper-based electrode arrays for neural activity recording

Yichuan Guo1,2, Zhiqiang Fang3, Mingde Du1,2, Long Yang4, Leihou Shao1,2, Xiaorui Zhang1,2, Li Li1,2, Jidong Shi1,2, Jinsong Tao3, Jinfen Wang1,2, Hongbian Li1,2 (*), and Ying Fang1,2,5 (*)

1 CAS Key Laboratory for Biomedical Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety, CAS Center for Excellence in Nanoscience, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, Beijing 100190, China
2 University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China
3 State Key Laboratory of Pulp and Paper Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640, China
4 Department of Neurobiology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
5 CAS Center for Excellence in Brain Science and Intelligence Technology, 320 Yue Yang Road, Shanghai 200031, China

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-018-2005-0

Nano Research 2018, 11(10): 5604每5614

Address correspondence to Ying Fang, fangy@nanoctr.cn; Hongbian Li, lihb@nanoctr.cn

Flexible and biocompatible neural electrode arrays based on a nanopaper substrate have been developed. These electrode arrays exhibit high sensitivity and stability in long-term brain activity recording.

    

The shape effect of reconstituted high-density lipoprotein nanocarriers on brain delivery and A汕 clearance

Huahua Song1,∫, Xinyi Ma1,∫, Jianrong Xu1,∫, Qingxiang Song1, Meng Hu1,3, Xiao Gu1, Qian Zhang1, Lina Hou1, Lepei Chen1, Yukun Huang2, Ping Yu1, Dayuan Wang1, Gan Jiang1, Meng Huang1, Jun Chen2, Hongzhuan Chen1 (*), and Xiaoling Gao1 (*)

1 Department of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology, Faculty of Basic Medicine, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200025, China
2 Key Laboratory of Smart Drug Delivery, Ministry of Education, School of Pharmacy, Fudan University, Lane 826, Zhangheng Road, Shanghai 201203, China
3 Department of Pharmacy, Ren Ji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200127, China
Huahua Song, Xinyi Ma, and Jianrong Xu contributed equally to this work.

 

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-018-2107-8

Nano Research 2018, 11(10): 5615每5628

Address correspondence to Hongzhuan Chen, hongzhuan_chen@hotmail.com; Xiaoling Gao, shellygao1@sjtu.edu.cn

Here, we constructed two discoidal reconstituted high-density lipoprotein (rHDL) nanocarriers (d-rHDL and d-GM1-rHDL) and two spherical rHDL nanocarriers (s-rHDL and s-GM1-rHDL) and for the first time demonstrated the shape effect of rHDL nanocarriers on their brain delivery and amyloid 汕 clearance capacity.

    

Traditional Chinese medicine molecule-assisted chemical synthesis of fluorescent anti-cancer silicon nanoparticles

Xiaoyuan Ji, Daoxia Guo, Bin Song, Sicong Wu, Binbin Chu, Yuanyuan Su, and Yao He (*)

Laboratory of Nanoscale Biochemical Analysis, Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Jiangsu, Suzhou 215123, China
Xiaoyuan Ji and Daoxia Guo contributed equally to this work.

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-018-1976-1

Nano Research 2018, 11(10): 5629每5641

Address correspondence to yaohe@suda.edu.cn

A novel TCM-assisted chemical synthetic strategy is introduced for the one-pot synthesis of small-sized water-dispersed AC-SiNPs, which simultaneously possess robust fluorescence, excellent storage stability, and more interestingly, intrinsic anti-cancer efficacy with good selectivity towards cancer cells. Furthermore, the as-prepared AC-SiNPs are further employed for synergistic fluorescence bioimaging and treatment of tumors.

    

Polyplex interaction strength as a driver of potency during cancer immunotherapy

Shannon J. Tsai1, James I. Andorko1, Xiangbin Zeng1, Joshua M. Gammon1, and Christopher M. Jewell1,2,3,4,5 (*)

1 Fischell Department of Bioengineering, University of Maryland, 8278 Paint Branch Drive, College Park, MD 20742, USA
2 Robert E. Fischell Institute for Biomedical Devices, University of Maryland, 8278 Paint Branch Drive, College Park, MD 20742, USA
3 United States Department of Veterans Affairs, Maryland VA Health Care System, 10 North Greene Street, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
4 Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Maryland Medical School, 685 West Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
5 Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, 22 South Greene Street, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-018-2181-y

Nano Research 2018, 11(10): 5642每5656

Address correspondence to cmjewell@umd.edu

The interaction strength within polyplexes between a molecular adjuvant (CpG) and a degradable polycation (poly (汕-amino ester), PBAE) is dependent on the ratio of these components during assembly. The interaction strength impacts the uptake and processing of the CpG, and the resulting immune response during activation of antigen presenting cells, expansion of tumor-specific T cells, and tumor immunotherapy.

    

Versatile multiplexed super-resolution imaging of nanostructures by Quencher-Exchange-PAINT

Tobias Lutz1, Alexander H. Clowsley1, Ruisheng Lin1, Stefano Pagliara1, Lorenzo Di Michele2, and Christian Soeller1 (*)

1 Living Systems Institute & Biomedical Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QD, UK
2 Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0HE, UK

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-018-1971-6

Nano Research 2018, 11(10): 5657每5669

Address correspondence to c.soeller@exeter.ac.uk

Multiplexed optical super-resolution imaging based on DNA nanotechnology (ExchangePAINT) was refined to enable shorter switching times and imaging in conventional fluorescence microscopy setups by blocking unwanted imager strands with complementary quencher strands.

    

Curcumin-loaded polymeric nanoparticles for neuroprotection in neonatal rats with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

Andrea Joseph1, Thomas Wood2, Chih-Chung Chen1,†, Kylie Corry2, Jessica M. Snyder3, Sandra E. Juul2, Pratik Parikh2, and Elizabeth Nance1,4 (*)

1 Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
2 Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
3 Department of Comparative Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
4 Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
Present address: Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801, USA

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-018-2104-y

Nano Research 2018, 11(10): 5670每5688

Address correspondence to eanance@uw.edu

Curcumin-loaded brain-penetrating nanoparticles can cross the impaired blood-brain barrier following systemic administration in a neonatal hypoxia-ischemia rat model. The brain-penetrating nanoparticles localize in regions of injury and release curcumin to provide a neuroprotective effect, expanding the number of clinically-relevant therapeutic interventions for the treatment of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

    

Polymersomes scalably fabricated via flash nanoprecipitation are non-toxic in non-human primates and associate with leukocytes in the spleen and kidney following intravenous administration

Sean D. Allen1, Yu-Gang Liu2, Sharan Bobbala2, Lei Cai3, Peter I. Hecker3,4, Ryan Temel3,4, and Evan A. Scott1,2 (*)

1 Interdisciplinary Biological Sciences, Northwestern University, IL 60208, USA
2 Department of Biomedical Engineering, Northwestern University, IL 60208, USA
3 Saha Cardiovascular Research Center, University of Kentucky, KY 40506, USA
4 Department of Pharmacology and Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky, KY 40506, USA

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-018-2069-x

Nano Research 2018, 11(10): 5689每5703

Address correspondence to evan.scott@northwestern.edu

Poly (ethylene glycol)-block-poly (propylene sulfide)(PEG-bl-PPS) polymersomes formed by flash nanoprecipitation were found to be non-toxic after repeated intravenous administration in non-human primates. Polymersomes were taken up by antigen-presenting cell subsets in the liver, kidneys, and spleen of treated cynomolgus monkeys.

    

Engineering subcellular-patterned biointerfaces to regulate the surface wetting of multicellular spheroids

Luying Wang1,3, Pingqiang Cai4, Jing Luo2,3, Feilong Zhang1,3, Jian Liu2, Yupeng Chen2,3, Zhongpeng Zhu2,3, Yongyang Song2,3, Bingquan Yang2, Xi Liu2,3, Xiaodong Chen4, and Shutao Wang2,3 (*)

1 Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), Key Laboratory of Green Printing, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China
2 CAS Key Laboratory of Bio-inspired Materials and Interfacial Science, CAS Center for Excellence in Nanoscience, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China
3 University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China
4 School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798, Singapore

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-018-2117-6

Nano Research 2018, 11(10): 5704每5715

Address correspondence to stwang@mail.ipc.ac.cn

Subcellular-patterned biointerfaces were employed to inhibit the surface wetting of multicellular spheroids.

    

Direct imaging and determination of the crystal structure of six-layered graphdiyne

Chao Li1,∫, Xiuli Lu1,∫, Yingying Han1, Shangfeng Tang1, Yi Ding1, Ruirui Liu1, Haihong Bao1, Yuliang Li2, Jun Luo1 (*), and Tongbu Lu1 (*)
1 Center for Electron Microscopy, TUT-FEI Joint Laboratory, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Advanced Porous Functional Materials, Institute for New Energy Materials & Low-Carbon Technologies, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384, China
2 Key Laboratory of Organic Solids, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China
Chao Li and Xiuli Lu contributed equally to this work.

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-017-1789-7

Nano Research 2018, 11(3): 1714每1721

Address correspondence to Jun Luo, jluo@tjut.edu.cn; Tongbu Lu, lutongbu@tjut.edu.cn

Since its discovery, the direct imaging and determination of the crystal structure of few-layer graphdiyne has proven difficult. In this work, we successfully employed low-voltage transmission electron microscopy with low current density to realize the direct imaging of graphdiyne and confirmed that the structure of an as-synthesized graphdiyne nanosheet is crystalline, with six-layer thickness and ABC stacking.

    

Facile synthesis of fully ordered L10-FePt nanoparticles with controlled Pt-shell thicknesses for electrocatalysis

Yonghoon Hong1, Hee Jin Kim2, Daehee Yang1, Gaehang Lee3, Ki Min Nam4, Myung-Hwa Jung5, Young-Min Kim6,7 (*), Sang-Il Choi2 (*), and Won Seok Seo1 (*)

1 Department of Chemistry, Sogang University, Seoul 04107, Republic of Korea
2 Department of Chemistry and Green-Nano Materials Research Center, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 41566, Republic of Korea
3 Korea Basic Science Institute and University of Science and Technology, Daejeon 34133, Republic of Korea
4 Department of Chemistry, Mokpo National University, Jeonnam 58554, Republic of Korea
5 Department of Physics, Sogang University, Seoul 04107, Republic of Korea
6 Center for Integrated Nanostructure Physics, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Suwon 16419, Republic of Korea
7 Department of Energy Science, Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU), Suwon 16419, Republic of Korea

DOI 10.1007/s12274-017-1495-5

Nano Research 2017, 10(8): 2866每2880

Address correspondence to Young-Min Kim, youngmk@skku.edu; Sang-Il Choi, sichoi@knu.ac.kr; Won Seok Seo, wsseo@sogang.ac.kr

We controlled the Pt-shell thickness of fully L10-ordered face-centered tetragonal (fct) FePt nanoparticles (NPs) by using several acids with different acid strengths for surface-Fe etching and studied the effects of both surface-Fe etching and Pt-shell thickness on the electrocatalytic properties of fct-FePt NPs for the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR).

    

Acidity-triggered TAT-presenting nanocarriers augment tumor retention and nuclear translocation of drugs

Wei Jiang1, Jilong Wang2, Jinbin Yang3, Zhiwei He4, Zhenhui Hou4, Yingli Luo2, Li Wang2, Jing Liu2, Houbing Zhang1, Yangyang Zhao2, Guoqing Zhang1, Fang Huang4, Xuechang Zhou3, Lifeng Yan1 (*), Xianzhu Yang5 (*), Yucai Wang2 (*), and Jun Wang5

1 Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230027, China
2 The CAS Key Laboratory of Innate Immunity and Chronic Disease, School of Life Sciences and Medical Center, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230027, China
3 School of Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060, China
4 School of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230027, China
5 Institutes for Life Sciences, School of Medicine and National Engineering Research Center for Tissue Restoration and Reconstruction, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006, China

 

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-017-1925-4

Nano Research 2018, 11(10): 5716每5734

Address correspondence to Yucai Wang, yucaiwang@ustc.edu.cn; Xianzhu Yang, yangxz@hfut.edu.cn; Lifeng Yan, lfyan@ustc.edu.cn

A transactivator of transcription (TAT)-presenting nanomedicine, apart from improving tumor accumulation and cellular uptake, can simultaneously enhance tumor retention and promote nuclear translocation of the encapsulated platinum prodrugs, and thus improve therapeutic efficacy.

    

A facile fabrication route for binary transition metal oxide-based Janus nanoparticles for cancer theranostic applications

M. Zubair Iqbal1, Wenzhi Ren1, Madiha Saeed1, Tianxiang Chen1, Xuehua Ma1, Xu Yu1, Jichao Zhang2, Lili Zhang2, Aiguo Li2, and Aiguo Wu1 (*)

1 Key Laboratory of Magnetic Materials and Devices, CAS & Key Laboratory of Additive Manufacturing Materials of Zhejiang Province, & Division of Functional Materials and Nano devices, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201, China
2 Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201204, China

 

DOI 10.1007/s12274-017-1628-x

Nano Research 2018, 11(10): 5735每5750

Address correspondence to aiguo@nimte.ac.cn

A unique liquid-phase method was employed to fabricate Mn3O4- TiO2/ZnO/Fe3O4 multifunctional binary transition metal oxide-based Janus nanoparticles, using the concept of epitaxial growth and lattice mismatch among synthesized materials. These multifunctional Mn3O4-TiO2 Janus nanoparticles enhance T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging contrast in the heart, liver, and kidneys and show excellent tumor ablation in photodynamic therapy.

    

LiF@SiO2 nanocapsules for controlled lithium release and osteoarthritis treatment

Trever Todd1,∫, Zhenhui Lu2,∫, Jinmin Zhao2,∫, Benjamin Cline1, Weizhong Zhang1, Hongmin Chen1,3, Anil Kumar1, Wen Jiang1, Franklin West4, Samuel Franklin5, Li Zheng2 (*), and Jin Xie1 (*)

1 Department of Chemistry, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602, USA
2 Guangxi Engineering Center in Biomedical Material for Tissue and Organ Regeneration, Guangxi Collaborative Innovation Center for Biomedicine, Guangxi Key Laboratory of Regenerative Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University, Nanning 530021, China
3 Center for Molecular Imaging and Translational Medicine, State Key Laboratory of Molecular Vaccinology and Molecular Diagnostics, School of Public Health, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361102, China
4 Animal Dairy Science, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602, USA
5 Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602, USA
∫ Trever Todd, Zhenhui Lu, and Jinmin Zhao contributed equally to this work.

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-018-2061-5

Nano Research 2018, 11(10): 5751每5760

Address correspondence to Li Zheng, zhengli224@163.com; Jin Xie, jinxie@uga.edu

Controlled lithium delivery for efficient osteoarthritis therapy is described. We use a LiF nanocrystal as a lithium reservoir, silica coating to control the lithium release rate, and hyaluronic acid as the delivery medium. The sustained lithium release elicits broad inhibition of osteoarthritis-related catabolic markers, leading to effective protection of cartilage.

    

Selenium-functionalized metal-organic frameworks as enzyme mimics

Weiqiang Zhou1,2, Hongfeng Li1, Bin Xia1, Wenlan Ji1, Shaobo Ji2, Weina Zhang1, Wei Huang1(*), Fengwei Huo1(*), and Huaping Xu2 (*)

1 Key Laboratory of Flexible Electronics (KLOFE) and Institute of Advanced Materials (IAM), Jiangsu National Synergetic Innovation Center for Advanced Materials (SICAM), Nanjing Tech University (Nanjing Tech), Nanjing 211816, China
2 Key Laboratory of Organic Optoelectronics and Molecular Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China

DOI 10.1007/s12274-017-1623-2

Nano Research 2018, 11(10): 5761每5768

Address correspondence to Huaping Xu, xuhuaping@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; Wei Huang, iamwhuang@njtech.edu.cn; Fengwei Huo, iamfwhuo@njtech.edu.cn

A general and facile method to fabricate efficient glutathione peroxidase (GPx) mimics has been developed by grafting seleniumcontaining molecules (phenylselenylbromide, PhSeBr) to a of Zr(IV)-based UiO-66-NH2 framework. The as-prepared UiO-66-Se systems show good catalytic activity over three cycles. The highefficiency GPx mimic metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are endowed with excellent thermal and structural stability, providing a promising avenue for the development of artificial enzyme mimics.

    

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