Research Article

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2012, 5(9): 630–639

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https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-012-0248-8

Chiral Guanosine 5,-Monophosphate-Capped Gold Nanoflowers: Controllable Synthesis, Characterization, Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Activity, Cellular Imaging and Photothermal Therapy

Peng Huang1,2,§, Omar Pandoli1,§, Xiansong Wang1, Zhe Wang2,3, Zhiming Li4, Chunlei Zhang1, Feng Chen1, Jing Lin1, Daxiang Cui1 (), and Xiaoyuan Chen2 ()

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1 National Key Laboratory of Nano/Micro Fabrication Technology, Key Laboratory for Thin Film and Microfabrication of Ministry of Education, Institute of Micro-Nano Science and Technology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, China
2 Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine (LOMIN), National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
3 Center for Molecular Imaging and Translational Medicine, School of Public Health, Xiamen University, Xiamen, 361005, China
4 Institute of Dermatology and Department of Dermatology at No. 1 Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325000, China
§ These authors equally contributed to this article

Keywords: Gold nanoflower, chirality, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), dark-field imaging, photothermal therapy
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  • Abstract
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Plasmonics and chirality in metal nanomaterials are intriguing and inspiring phenomena. Nanoscale chirality of metal nanomaterials has emerged as a hot topic in the past several years. Generally, most plasmon-induced circular dichroism (CD) responses of nanomaterials (> 10 nm) have been artificially created by modifying pre-made achiral nanomaterials with chiral agents, because the in situ generation of plasmon-induced CD responses of nanomaterials with larger size (> 10 nm) is not easy. Herein, we report a simple one-pot green synthesis of chiral gold nanoflowers (GNFs) with abundant petal-shaped tips in the chiral reduction environment arising from the presence of chiral guanosine 5’-monophosphate (5’-GMP) and the chiral reducing agent L-ascorbic acid (L-AA). Different reducing agents can impact the shape and chirality of the products. In addition, the size and chirality of the GNFs can be controlled by adjusting the reaction time. The as-synthesized GNFs have good biocompatibility and can be used for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) enhancement, cellular dark-field imaging and photothermal therapy.
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Chiral Guanosine 5,-Monophosphate-Capped Gold Nanoflowers: Controllable Synthesis, Characterization, Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Activity, Cellular Imaging and Photothermal Therapy. Nano Res. 2012, 5(9): 630–639 https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-012-0248-8

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