Research Article

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2020, 13(7): 1988–1995

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https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-020-2898-2

Controlled growth of crossed ultralong carbon nanotubes by gas flow

Zhenxing Zhu1, Yunxiang Bai1, Nan Wei2, Jun Gao1, Silei Sun1, Chenxi Zhang1, and Fei Wei1 (*)

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1 Beijing Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Reaction Engineering and Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China
2 Nano Materials Group, Department of Applied Physics and Center for New Materials, School of Science, Aalto University, PO Box 15100, FI-00076 Aalto, Finland

Keywords: crossed ultralong carbon nanotubes, nanoscale patterning, controlled synthesis, fluidic assembly
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  • Abstract
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Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) work as the promising components of miniature electromechanical systems due to their excellent performances from individual to bundle scales. But it’s challenging to achieve precise patterning at nanoscale resolution with controlled position and orientation. Here, we demonstrate a fluidic strategy to interlace one-dimensional (1D) ultralong CNTs into the crossed pattern in a one-step in-situ process. Semi-circular substrates of different diameters were placed in front of the growth substrate to change the path and momentum of gas flow. Such flow perturbation caused by substrates could be markedly reflected within a micro-channel reactor, which led to formation of crossed ultralong CNTs at definite positions. Furthermore, precise control over the crossing angle as well as the diameter distribution of CNTs was achieved by varying the CNT length and diameter of semi-circular substrates. Our strategy has offered a feasible route for production of crossed ultralong CNTs and will contribute to multidimensional fluidic assembly of flexible nanomaterials.
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Controlled growth of crossed ultralong carbon nanotubes by gas flow. Nano Res. 2020, 13(7): 1988–1995 https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-020-2898-2

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