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Nanoscience and the nano-bioelectronics frontier

Xiaojie Duan1 (*) and Charles M. Lieber2,3 (*)

1 Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China
2 Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA
3 School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA

DOI 10.1007/s12274-014-0692-8

Nano Research 2015, 8(1): 1每22

Address correspondence to Xiaojie Duan, xjduan@pku.edu.cn; Charles M. Lieber, cml@cmliris.harvard.edu

This review summarizes some of the considerations that have led to our focus on bottom-up nanoscience, recaps our seminal contributions to nanowire-based nanoscience and technology, and describes in more detail nanowire-based electronic devices as revolutionary tools for brain science.

    

A mini review of NiFe-based materials as highly active oxygen evolution reaction electrocatalysts

Ming Gong and Hongjie Dai (*)

Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA

DOI 10.1007/s12274-014-0591-z

Nano Research 2015, 8(1): 23每39

The review summarizes the old discovery and recent progress on NiFe-based compounds for oxygen evolution reaction electrocatalysis.

The review summarizes the old discovery and recent progress on NiFe-based compounds for oxygen evolution reaction electrocatalysis.

    

Synthesis, properties and applications of one- and two- dimensional gold nanostructures

Xun Hong, Chaoliang Tan, Junze Chen, Zhichuan Xu, and Hua Zhang (*)

School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798, Singapore

DOI 10.1007/s12274-014-0636-3

Nano Research 2015, 8(1): 40每55

Address correspondence to hzhang@ntu.edu.sg, hzhang166@yahoo.com

This review article gives an overview of the recent developmentsin synthesis of one- and two-dimensional Au nanostructures as wellas their properties and applications.

    

Enabling practical electrocatalyst-assisted photoelectrochemical water splitting with earth abundant materials

Xiaogang Yang1 (*), Rui Liu2,3, Yumin He3, James Thorne3, Zhi Zheng1, and Dunwei Wang3 (*)

1 Key Laboratory of Micro每Nano Materials for Energy Storage and Conversion of Henan Province and Institute of Surface Micro and Nano Materials, Xuchang University, Henan 461000, China
2 Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, California Institute of Technology, Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA
3 Department of Chemistry, Boston College, Merkert Chemistry Center, 2609 Beacon St., Chestnut Hill, MA 02467, USA

DOI 10.1007/s12274-014-0645-2

Nano Research 2015, 8(1): 56每81

Address correspondence to Xiaogang Yang, xiaogang.yang@gmail.com; Dunwei Wang, dunwei.wang@bc.edu

High efficiency photoelectrochemical water splitting devices rely on the development of new earth abundant semiconductors, electrocatalysts, and especially the interfaces between different components.

    

Shape-controlled syntheses of rhodium nanocrystals for the enhancement of their catalytic properties

Shuifen Xie1, Xiang Yang Liu1, and Younan Xia2 (*)

1 Research Institute for Soft Matter and Biomimetics and Department of Physics, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005, China
2 The Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, and School of Chemistry and Biochemistry and School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332, United States

DOI 10.1007/s12274-014-0674-x

Nano Research 2015, 8(1): 82每96

Address correspondence to younan.xia@bme.gatech.edu

This review article highlights recent progress in the syntheses of Rh nanocrystals with a number of well-controlled shapes, together with their use in various catalytic reactions, where the activity and/or selectivity can be enhanced through shape engineering.

    

Chinese brushes: From controllable liquid manipulation to template-free printing microlines

Qianbin Wang1, Qingan Meng1, Huan Liu1 (*), and Lei Jiang1,2

1 Key Laboratory of Bio-Inspired Smart Interfacial Science and Technology of Ministry of Education, Beijing Key Laboratory of Bio-inspired Energy Materials and Devices, School of Chemistry and Environment, Beihang University, Beijing, 100191, China
2 Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), Key Laboratory of Organic Solids, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100190, China

DOI 10.1007/s12274-014-0699-1

Nano Research 2015, 8(1): 97每105

Address correspondence to liuh@buaa.edu.cn

In this mini-review, we show how the key to the controllableliquid transfer in a Chinese brush lies in the anisotropic multi-scale structural features of the freshly emergent hairs. Drawinginspiration from this, applications in controllable liquid pumping,highly efficient liquid transfer and template-free printing microlines

    

Ag3PO4 colloidal nanocrystal clusters with controllable shape and superior photocatalytic activity

Fei Pang, Xueteng Liu, Mingyuan He, and Jianping Ge (*)

Department of Chemistry, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Green Chemistry and Chemical Processes,East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062, China

DOI 10.1007/s12274-014-0580-2

Nano Research 2015, 8(1): 106每116

Address correspondence to jpge@chem.ecnu.edu.cn

Cluster-like Ag3PO4 nanostructures but with specific shape and crystal orientations have been prepared by the synergetic reaction of Ag nanocrystals, phosphate salts and hydrogen peroxide. Their shape-dependent photocatalytic activities are much higher than commercial TiO2 and some reported Ag3PO4 microcrystals

    

Sodium iron hexacyanoferrate with high Na content as a Na-rich cathode material for Na-ion batteries

Ya You1, Xiqian Yu2, Yaxia Yin1, Kyung-Wan Nam3 (*), and Yu-Guo Guo1 (*)

1 CAS Key Laboratory of Molecular Nanostructure and Nanotechnology, and Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing 100190, China
2 Chemistry Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA
3 Department of Energy and Materials Engineering, Dongguk University, Seoul 100-715, Republic of Korea

DOI 10.1007/s12274-014-0588-7

Nano Research 2015, 8(1): 117每128

Address correspondence to Yu-Guo Guo, ygguo@iccas.ac.cn; Kyung-Wan Nam, knam@dongguk.edu

Sodium iron hexacyanoferrate with high Na content (~1.63 per formula unit) has been obtained by employing a facile and effective protection strategy, and the material shows high Coulombic efficiency and impressive cycling stability as promising Na-rich cathode materials for full Na-ion cells.

    

Microporous bamboo biochar for lithium−sulfur batteries

Xingxing Gu1, Yazhou Wang1, Chao Lai1, Jingxia Qiu1, Sheng Li1, Yanglong Hou2 (*), Wayde Martens3, Nasir Mahmood2, and Shanqing Zhang1 (*)

1 Centre for Clean Environment and Energy, Environmental Futures Research Institute, Griffith School of Environment, Gold Coast Campus, Griffith University, QLD 4222, Australia
2 Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China
3 Science and Engineering Faculty, Queensland University of Technology QLD 4001, Australia

DOI 10.1007/s12274-014-0601-1

Nano Research 2015, 8(1): 129每139

Address correspondence to Shangqing Zhang, s.zhang@griffith.edu.au; Yanglong Hou, hou@pku.edu.cn

Bamboo biochar has been successfully activated and used to fabricate a porous carbon每sulfur nanocomposite as the cathode material in Li每S batteries. The bamboo carbon每sulfur nanocomposite cathode gives excellent electrochemical performance.

    

Phase-transfer interface promoted corrosion from PtNi10 nanoctahedra to Pt4Ni nanoframes

Yu Wang, Yueguang Chen, Caiyun Nan, Lingling Li, Dingsheng Wang, Qing Peng (*), and Yadong Li (*)

Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China

DOI 10.1007/s12274-014-0603-z

Nano Research 2015, 8(1): 140每155

Address correspondence to Yadong Li, ydli@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; Qing Peng, pengqing@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn

Fascinating Pt4Ni nanoframes and PtNi4 porous octahedra have been obtained from the corrosion of pristine PtNi10 nanoctahedra, promoted by a phase-transfer interface in a two-phase approach, and shown to exhibit modified activities toward ethanol electrooxidation and hydrogenation of nitrobenzene.

    

Uniform MnO2 nanostructures supported on hierar- chically porous carbon as efficient electrocatalysts for rechargeable Li每O2 batteries

Xiaopeng Han, Fangyi Cheng (*), Chengcheng Chen, Yuxiang Hu, and Jun Chen (*)

Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials Chemistry (Ministry of Education), College of Chemistry, Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071, China

DOI 10.1007/s12274-014-0604-y

Nano Research 2015, 8(1): 156每164

Address correspondence to Fangyi Cheng, fycheng@nankai.edu.cn; Jun Chen, chenabc@nankai.edu.cn

MnO2 nanostructures supported on hierarchically porous carbon have been synthesized and exhibited excellent Li每O2 battery performance, resulting from good catalytic activity and favorable transportation of ions, oxygen and electrons.

    

Multifunctional ultrasmall Pd nanosheets for enhanced near-infrared photothermal therapy and chemotherapy of cancer

Shaoheng Tang, Mei Chen, and Nanfeng Zheng (*)

State Key Laboratory for Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces, Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemistry for Energy Materials, and Department of Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005, China

DOI 10.1007/s12274-014-0605-x

Nano Research 2015, 8(1): 165每174

Address correspondence to nfzheng@xmu.edu.cn

Enhanced cancer therapy has been achieved by combining chemotherapy and enhanced photothermal therapy

    

Chemically exfoliated metallic MoS2 nanosheets: A promising supporting co-catalyst for enhancing the photocatalytic performance of TiO2 nanocrystals

Song Bai, Limin Wang, Xiaoyi Chen, Junteng Du, and Yujie Xiong (*)

Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale, Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemistry for Energy Materials, and School of Chemistry and Materials Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026, China

DOI 10.1007/s12274-014-0606-9

Nano Research 2015, 8(1): 175每183

Address correspondence to yjxiong@ustc.edu.cn

MoS2 nanosheets with 1T (octahedral) phase have been demonstrated as a co-catalyst for integration with photocatalyst TiO2. The developed hybrid structure exhibits excellent performance, in sharp contrast to bare TiO2 and the hybrid counterpart with 2H-MoS2, in both photocatalytic hydrogen production and Rhodamine B degradation.

    

Ice-templated preparation and sodium storage of ultrasmall SnO2 nanoparticles embedded in three- dimensional graphene

Longkai Pei, Qi Jin, Zhiqiang Zhu, Qing Zhao, Jing Liang, and Jun Chen (*)

Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials Chemistry (Ministry of Education), Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering, College of Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071, China

DOI 10.1007/s12274-014-0609-6

Nano Research 2015, 8(1): 184每192

Address correspondence to chenabc@nankai.edu.cn

SnO2@3DG has been explored as the anode material of rechargeable Na-ion batteries, showing a discharge capacity of 1,155 mA﹞h﹞g每1 in the first cycle at 100 mA﹞g每1 and a capacity retention of 85.7% from the second cycle (504 mA﹞h﹞g每1) to the 200th cycle (432 mA﹞h﹞g每1).

    

Metallic mesocrystal nanosheets of vanadium nitride for high-performance all-solid-state pseudocapacitors

Wentuan Bi1, Zhenpeng Hu2, Xiaogang Li1, Changzheng Wu1 (*), Junchi Wu1, Yubin Wu1, and Yi Xie1

1 Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale and Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemistry for Energy Materials, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026, China
2 School of Physics, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071, China

DOI 10.1007/s12274-014-0612-y

Nano Research 2015, 8(1): 193每200

Address correspondence to czwu@ustc.edu.cn

Mesocrystal nanosheets of vanadium nitride (VN) are fabricated via a confined-growth route from thermally stable layered vanadium bronze for the first time. VN mesocrystal nanosheets with facet- tunable building blocks bring synergic advantages of unprecedentedly high electrical conductivity and unique pseudocapacitive reactivity, giving a superior specific volumetric capacitance in all-solid-state thin-film supercapacitors.

    

Nucleolin targeting AS1411 aptamer modified pH-sensitive micelles for enhanced delivery and antitumor efficacy of paclitaxel

Jinming Zhang1, Ruie Chen1, Xiefan Fang2, Fengqian Chen1, Yitao Wang1 (*), and Meiwan Chen1 (*)

1 State Key Laboratory of Quality Research in Chinese Medicine, Institute of Chinese Medical Sciences, University of Macau, Macao 999078, China
2 Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA

DOI 10.1007/s12274-014-0619-4

Nano Research 2015, 8(1): 201每218

Address correspondence to M. Chen, mwchen@umac.mo; Y. Wang, ytwang@umac.mo

A dual-functional mixed micellar system with cancer targeting and pH sensitive properties has been developed for paclitaxel delivery in ovarian tumor treatment.

    

Triboelectrification induced UV emission from plasmon discharge

Chang Bao Han1,∫, Chi Zhang1,∫, Jingjing Tian1, Xiaohui Li1, Limin Zhang1, Zhou Li1, and Zhong Lin Wang1,2 (*)

1 Beijing Institute of Nanoenergy and Nanosystems, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083, China
2 School of Material Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332, USA
These authors contributed equally to this work.

DOI 10.1007/s12274-014-0634-5

Nano Research 2015, 8(1): 219每226

Address correspondence to zlwang@gatech.edu

A deep UV light emission was obtained using triboelectrification induced plasma discharge. By means of a low-frequency mechanical friction, the changing electric field caused by tribocharges can cause a plasma discharge and give out 253.7 nm UV irradiation.

    

Stability of BN/metal interfaces in gaseous atmosphere

Yang Yang1 , Qiang Fu1 (*), Mingming Wei1, Hendrik Bluhm2, and Xinhe Bao1(*)

1State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023, China
2Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720, USA

DOI 10.1007/s12274-014-0639-0

Nano Research 2015, 8(1): 227每237

Address correspondence to Qiang Fu, qfu@dicp.ac.cn; Xinhe Bao, xhbao@dicp.ac.cn

Oxygen intercalation at BN/Ru(0001) interface occurs at BN islands in 10每8 Torr O2 and on full BN layer in 0.1 Torr O2, which decouples the BN overlayer from the substrate and simultaneously oxidizes the metal surface.

    

Magnetic yolk每shell structured anatase-based microspheres loaded with Au nanoparticles for heterogeneous catalysis

Chun Wang1, Junchen Chen1, Xinran Zhou1, Wei Li1, Yong Liu1, Qin Yue1, Zhaoteng Xue1, Yuhui Li1, Ahmed A. Elzatahry2,3, Yonghui Deng1 (*), and Dongyuan Zhao1

1 Department of Chemistry, Laboratory of Advanced Materials, State Key Laboratory of Molecular Engineering of Polymers, and Shanghai Key Laboratory of Molecular Catalysis and Innovative Materials, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433, China
2 Department of Chemistry, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia
3 Polymer Materials Research Department, Advanced Technology and New Materials Research Institute, City for Scientific Research and Technology Applications, New Borg El-Arab City, Alexandria 21934, Egypt

DOI 10.1007/s12274-014-0647-0

Nano Research 2015, 8(1): 238每245

Address correspondence to yhdeng@fudan.edu.cn

Magnetic yolk每shell structured anatase-based microspheres were fabricated through successive and facile sol每gel coating on magnetite particles, followed by annealing treatments. Upon loading with gold nanoparticles, the obtained functional magnetic microspheres showed superior performance as stable heterogeneous catalysts in catalyzing the epoxidation of styrene with extraordinary high conversion (89.5%) and selectivity (90.8%) towards styrene oxide after reaction for 33 h.

    

Controlling the Lateral and Vertical Dimensions of Bi2Se3 Nanoplates via Seeded Growth

Awei Zhuang1,∫, Yuzhou Zhao1,∫, Xianli Liu1, Mingrui Xu1, Youcheng Wang1, Unyong Jeong2 (*), Xiaoping Wang1, and Jie Zeng1 (*)

1 Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale, Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Center of Advanced Nanocatalysis (CAN-USTC) & Department of Chemical Physics, University of Science and Technologyof China, Hefei Anhui 230026, P. R. China
2 Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seoul, Korea
These authors contributed equally to this work.

DOI 10.1007/s12274-014-0657-y

Nano Research 2015, 8(1): 246每256

Address correspondence to Jie Zeng, zengj@ustc.edu.cn; Unyong Jeong, ujeong@yonsei.ac.kr

The seeded growth method and induced kinetic control has been employed to synthesize Bi2Se3 nanoplates with modifiable morphology.

    

Highly sensitive detection of mercury(II) ions with few- layer molybdenum disulfide

Shan Jiang1, Rui Cheng2, Rita Ng1, Yu Huang2,3, Xiangfeng Duan1,3 (*)

1 Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA
2 Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA
3 California Nanosystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA

DOI 10.1007/s12274-014-0658-x

Nano Research 2015, 8(1): 257每262

Address correspondence to Xiangfeng Duan, email: xduan@chem.ucla.edu

We have investigated the effects of mercury (II) ions on electronic transport of few-layer molybdenum disulfide, and explored MoS2 FETs for highly sensitive detection of mercury (II).

    

Facile preparation of organometallic perovskite films and high-efficiency solar cells using solid-state chemistry

Lei Chen1,2,∫, Feng Tang2,∫, Yixin Wang2,3, Shan Gao2, Weiguo Cao1, Jinhua Cai2 (*), and Liwei Chen2 (*)

1 Department of Chemistry, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444, China
2 i-Lab, Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123, China
3 Nano Science and Technology Institute, University of Science and Technology of China, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123, China
These authors contributed equally to this work.

DOI 10.1007/s12274-014-0662-1

Nano Research 2015, 8(1): 263每270

Address correspondence to Jinhua Cai, jhcai2013@sinano.ac.cn; Liwei Chen, lwchen2008@sinano.ac.cn

A solid-state reaction has been developed for the preparation oforganometallic perovskite thin films and perovskite solar cells.The method involves facile annealing of precursor films in contactwith each other and yields solar cells with the best efficiencyreaching 10%.

    

Core@shell sub-ten-nanometer noble metal nanoparticles with a controllable thin Pt shell and their catalytic activity towards oxygen reduction

Ntirikwendera Deogratias1, Muwei Ji1, Yong Zhang1, Jiajia Liu1, Jiatao Zhang1,2 (*), and Hesun Zhu1

1 Research Center of Materials Science, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing, 100081, China
2 Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing, 100081, China

DOI 10.1007/s12274-014-0664-z

Nano Research 2015, 8(1): 271每280

Address correspondence to zhangjt@bit.edu.cn

Core/shell sub-ten-nanometer metal nanoparticles with controllable thin Pt shell have been synthesized through an interface-mediated galvanic displacement reaction between monodisperse hydrophobic Au@Ag or Ag nanoparticles and a platinum salt in aqueous solution. Through oil-ethanol-H2O interface mediation, the galvanic displacement of Ag atoms with Pt can be achieved by facile control of the reaction kinetics. The Pt atoms have a high exposure ratio which leads to potential catalytic applications, such as oxygen reduction.

    

MoS2-wrapped silicon nanowires for photoelectro- chemical water reduction

Liming Zhang1,†,∫, Chong Liu1,∫, Andrew Barnabas Wong1,4, Joaquin Resasco2, and Peidong Yang1,3,4 (*)

1 Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
2 Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
3 Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
4 Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
Present address: Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
These authors contributed equally to this work.

DOI 10.1007/s12274-014-0673-y

Nano Research 2015, 8(1): 281每287

Address correspondence to p_yang@berkeley.edu

Silicon (Si) NW arrays have been employed as a model photocathode system for MoS2 wrapping, and their solar-driven hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) activity was evaluated. The photocathode comprises a well-defined MoS2/TiO2/Si coaxial NW heterostructure, which yielded photocurrent density up to 15 mA/cm2 at 0 V (vs. the reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE)) with good stability under the operating conditions employed.

    

Controlled synthesis of single-crystal SnSe nanoplates

Shuli Zhao1,2, Huan Wang1, Yu Zhou1,2, Lei Liao1, Ying Jiang3, Xiao Yang1, Guanchu Chen1, Min Lin1, Yong Wang3, Hailin Peng1,2 (*), and Zhongfan Liu1,2 (*)

1 Center for Nanochemistry, Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China
2 Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China
3 Center of Electron Microscopy and State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, China

DOI 10.1007/s12274-014-0676-8

Nano Research 2015, 8(1): 288每295

Address correspondence to Hailin Peng, hlpeng@pku.edu.cn; Zhongfan Liu, zfliu@pku.edu.cn

Single-crystal SnSe nanoplates have been synthesized on micasubstrates by a vapor deposition method. SnSe nanoplates showp-type conductivity and high photoresponsivity.

    

Understanding the discrepancy between the quality and yield in the synthesis of carbon nanotubes

Xiao Zhang, Pan Li, Hongbo Zhang, and Jie Liu (*)

Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708, United States

DOI 10.1007/s12274-014-0684-8

Nano Research 2015, 8(1): 296每302

Address correspondence to j.liu@duke.edu

The low yield of high-quality carbon nanotubes is caused by the rapid deactivation of the catalyst at high temperature. Modification of catalyst composition can significantly elongate the catalyst lifetime and improve the yield of high-quality carbon nanotubes.

    

Interface dipole enhancement effect and enhanced Rayleigh scattering

Wenyun Wu1,∫, Jingying Yue1, ∫, Dongqi Li1, Xiaoyang Lin1, Fangqiang Zhu2, Xue Yin3, Jun Zhu3, Xingcan Dai1 (*), Peng Liu1, Yang Wei1, Jiaping Wang1, Haitao Yang1, Lina Zhang1, Qunqing Li1, Shoushan Fan1, and Kaili Jiang1,4 (*)

1 State Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Quantum Physics, Department of Physics & Tsinghua-Foxconn Nanotechnology Research Center, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China
2 Department of Physics, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
3 State Key Laboratory of Precision Measurement Technology and Instruments, Department of Precision Instruments, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China 4 Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing 100084, China ∫ These authors contributed equally to this work.

DOI 10.1007/s12274-014-0687-5

Nano Research 2015, 8(1): 303每319

Address correspondence to Xingcan Dai, XingcanDai@tsinghua.edu.cn; Kaili Jiang, JiangKL@tsinghua.edu.cn

When illuminated by light, the nanometer or sub-nanometer interfacial layer of condensed molecules surrounding individual nanomaterials will behave as an optical dipole lattice and contribute an instantaneous near field to enhance the local field acting on nanomaterials. This interface dipole enhancement effect leads to enhanced Rayleigh scattering which not only enables true-color real-time imaging of nanomaterials, but also provides an effective means to peer into the subtle interfacial phenomena.

    

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