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Editorial

Xiaolin Li1 (*), Te車filo Rojo2 (*), and Jun Chen3 (*) (Guest Editors)

1 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352, USA
2 CIC Energigune energy cooperative research centre, Albert Einstein 48, 01510 Minano, Spain
3 Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials Chemistry (Ministry of Education), Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering, College of Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071, China

DOI 10.1007/s12274-017-1883-x

Nano Research 2017, 10(12): 3941

Address correspondence to Xiaolin Li, Xiaolin.li@pnnl.gov; Te車filo Rojo, trojo@cicenergigune.com; Jun Chen, chenabc@nankai.edu.cn

    

Nanostructured Na-ion and Li-ion anodes for battery application: A comparative overview

Ivana Hasa1,2,† (*), Jusef Hassoun3 (*), and Stefano Passerini1,2 (*)

1 Helmholtz Institute Ulm, Helmholtzstraße 11, Ulm 89081, Germany
2 Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), PO Box 3640, Karlsruhe 76021, Germany
3 Department of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Ferrara, via Fossato di Mortara, Ferrara 44121, Italy
Present address: Energy Storage and Distributed Resources Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA

DOI 10.1007/s12274-017-1513-7

Nano Research 2017, 10(12): 3942每3969

Address correspondence to Ivana Hasa, ivana.hasa@kit.edu; Jusef Hassoun, jusef.hassoun@unife.it; Stefano Passerini, stefano.passerini@kit.edu

Nanostructured materials for use as anode electrodes in Li- and Naion batteries allow for substantial improvements in their performance. However, there are significant differences between the two anode chemistries.

    

Practical considerations of Si-based anodes for lithiumion battery applications

Jaegeon Ryu, Dongki Hong, Hyun-Wook Lee (*), and Soojin Park (*)

Department of Energy Engineering, School of Energy and Chemical Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 44919, Republic of Korea
Jaegeon Ryu and Dongki Hong contributed equally to this work.

DOI 10.1007/s12274-017-1692-2

Nano Research 2017, 10(12): 3970每4002

Address correspondence to Soojin Park, spark@unist.ac.kr; Hyun-Wook Lee, hyunwooklee@unist.ac.kr

Practical considerations for successful implementation of Si-based anodes to full cells are extensively investigated in this review.

    

Nanoscale perspective: Materials designs and understandings in lithium metal anodes

Dingchang Lin1, Yayuan Liu1, Allen Pei1, and Yi Cui1,2 (*)

1 Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
2 Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA

DOI 10.1007/s12274-017-1596-1

Nano Research 2017, 10(12): 4003每4026

Address correspondence to yicui@stanford.edu

This review article provides an overview of recent progress and new understandings on Li metal anode enabled by nanotechnology.

    

Review of nanostructured current collectors in lithium每sulfur batteries

Long Kong, Hong-Jie Peng, Jia-Qi Huang, and Qiang Zhang (*)

Beijing Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Reaction Engineering and Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China

DOI 10.1007/s12274-017-1652-x

Nano Research 2017, 10(12): 4027每4054

Address correspondence to zhang-qiang@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn, zhangqiangflotu@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn

This review summarizes the nanostructured current collectors constructed by the rational integration of low-dimensional nanomaterials and examines the common attributes and requirements of their configuration and components in the S cathodes and Li anodes of Li每S batteries. We also describe various challenges and possible solutions regarding nanostructured current collectors for Li每S batteries.

    

Phosphorus and phosphide nanomaterials for sodium-ion batteries

Qingbing Xia1,2, Weijie Li2, Zongcheng Miao1 (*), Shulei Chou2 (*), and Huakun Liu2

1 Key Laboratory of Organic Polymer Photoelectric Materials, School of Science, Xijing University, Xi*an 710123, China
2 Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, Australian Institute of Innovative Materials, University of Wollongong, North Wollongong, NSW 2500, Australia

DOI 10.1007/s12274-017-1671-7

Nano Research 2017, 10(12): 4055每4081

Address correspondence to Zongcheng Miao, miaozongcheng@xijing.edu.cn; Shulei Chou, shulei@uow.edu.au

Phosphorus and phosphides show great promise as anode candidates for sodium-ion batteries because of their low cost and relatively high theoretical specific capacity. This review summarizes the recent research progress in nanostructured phosphorus and phosphides for sodium-ion batteries, as well as future challenges and opportunities.

    

Challenges and perspectives on high and intermediatetemperature sodium batteries

Karina B. Hueso1, Ver車nica Palomares1, Michel Armand2, and Te車filo Rojo1,2 (*)

1 Inorganic Chemistry Department, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, P.O. Box. 644, 48080 Bilbao, Spain
2 CIC ENERGIGUNE, Parque Tecnol車gico de Álava, Albert Einstein 48, ED.CIC, 01510 Miñano, Spain

DOI 10.1007/s12274-017-1602-7

Nano Research 2017, 10(12): 4082每4114

Address correspondence to trojo@cicenergigune

Sodium每sulfur (Na每S) and sodium每metal-halide (zeolite battery research Africa project (ZEBRA)) batteries are used in stationary applications for power quality and peak/load shaving. This review covers the recent advances in electrode and electrolyte materials for these electrochemical systems at high and intermediate temperatures.

    

Artificial interphase engineering of electrode materials to improve the overall performance of lithium-ion batterie

Zhiqiang Zhu and Xiaodong Chen (*)

Innovative Centre for Flexible Devices (iFLEX), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue 639798, Singapore

DOI 10.1007/s12274-017-1647-7

Nano Research 2017, 10(12): 4115每4138

Address correspondence to chenxd@ntu.edu.sg

This review summarizes recent advances in artificial interphase engineering of electrode materials to improve the overall performance of lithium-ion batteries. The effects of the artificial interphase on the electrode performance are discussed in de

    

Recent advances in solid polymer electrolytes for lithium batteries

Qingqing Zhang1, Kai Liu2, Fei Ding1 (*), and Xingjiang Liu1

1 National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Power Sources, Tianjin Institute of Power Sources, Tianjin 300384, China
2 School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300350, China

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-017-1763-4

Nano Research 2017, 10(12): 4139每4174

Address correspondence to feiding_ncps@163.com

The review focuses on the recent developments in solid polymer electrolytes, including the various kinds of polymer matrices and their corresponding modifications, and the detection of the interface between the solid polymer electrolytes and the anode, as well as factors influencing the interface.

    

Interest of molecular functionalization for electrochemical storage

Bihag Anothumakkool1, Dominique Guyomard1, Joël Gaubicher1 (*), and L谷naïc Madec2,3 (*)

1 Institut des Mat谷riaux Jean Rouxel (IMN), Universit谷 de Nantes, CNRS, 2 rue de la Houssini豕re, BP32229, 44322 Nantes Cedex 3, France
2 IPREM-ECP CNRS UMR 5254, Universit谷 de Pau, H谷lioparc Pau Pyr谷n谷es, 2 av. Pierre Angot, 64053 Pau Cedex 9, France
3 R谷seau sur le Stockage Electrochimique de l*Energie (RS2E), CNRS FR3459, 33 Rue Saint Leu, 80039 Amiens Cedex, France

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-017-1797-7

Nano Research 2017, 10(12): 4175每4200

Address correspondence to L谷naïc Madec, lenaic.madec@univ-pau.fr; Joël Gaubicher, Joel.Gaubicher@cnrs-imn.fr

This review presents the various developments in molecular functionalization to address the current limitations in electrochemical storage. Fundamental aspects regarding the effects of functionalized layer properties on the electrochemical performance as well as perspectives for further developments are also discussed.

    

Improving the structural stability of Li-rich cathode materials via reservation of cations in the Li-slab for Li-ion batteries

Ji-Lei Shi1,3, Dong-Dong Xiao2, Xu-Dong Zhang1,3,Ya-Xia Yin1, Yu-Guo Guo1,3 (*), Lin Gu2 (*), and Li-Jun Wan1 (*)

1 CAS Key Laboratory of Molecular Nanostructure and Nanotechnology, CAS Research/Education Center for Excellence in Molecular Sciences, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China
2 Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China
3 School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China

DOI 10.1007/s12274-017-1489-3

Nano Research 2017, 10(12): 4201每4209

Address correspondence to Yu-Guo Guo, ygguo@iccas.ac.cn; Lin Gu, l.gu@iphy.ac.cn; Li-Jun Wan, wanlijun@iccas.ac.cn

Here, we demonstrate that the structural evolution of Li-rich cathodes can be significantly inhibited by intentional introduction of certain adventive cations (like Ni2+) or by premeditated reservation of original Li+ ions residing in the Li slab in the delithiated state.

    

Simultaneous surface modification method for 0.4Li2MnO3- 0.6LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 cathode material for lithium ion batteries:Acid treatment and LiCoPO4 coating

Min-Joon Lee, Eunsol Lho, Pilgun Oh, Yoonkook Son, and Jaephil Cho (*)

Department of Energy Engineering, School of Energy and Chemical Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 44919, Republic of Korea

DOI 10.1007/s12274-017-1662-8

Nano Research 2017, 10(12): 4210每4220

Address correspondence to jpcho@unist.ac.kr

    

Suppressed oxygen extraction and degradation of LiNi xMnyCozO2 cathodes at high charge cut-off voltages

Jianming Zheng1,∫, Pengfei Yan2,∫, Jiandong Zhang2, Mark H. Engelhard2, Zihua Zhu2, Bryant J. Polzin3, Steve Trask3, Jie Xiao1, Chongmin Wang2 (*), and Jiguang Zhang1 (*)

1 Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, WA 99354, USA
2 Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 3335 Innovation Boulevard, Richland, WA 99354, USA
3 Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439, USA
Jianming Zheng and Pengfei Yan contributed equally to this work.

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-017-1761-6

Nano Research 2017, 10(12): 4221每4231

Address correspondence to Jiguang Zhang, jiguang.zhang@pnnl.gov; Chongmin Wang, chongmin.wang@pnnl.gov

The effect of the composition of lithium nickel-manganese-cobalt oxide (NMC) cathodes on the cycling stability of LiNixMnyCozO2 during high-voltage operation has been systematically investigated. The results demonstrate that the Co content has a dominating impact on the stability of NMC cathodes during high voltage cycling due to the significant overlap between the Co3+/4+ t2g band and the O2− 2p band.

    

Revisiting the conversion reaction voltage and the reversibility of the CuF2 electrode in Li-ion batteries

Joon Kyo Seo1,2, Hyung-Man Cho1,2, Katsunori Takahara1, Karena W. Chapman3, Olaf J. Borkiewicz3, Mahsa Sina1 (*), and Y. Shirley Meng1,2 (*)

1 Department of NanoEngineering, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA
2 Materials Science and Engineering, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA
3 X-ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439, USA

 

DOI 10.1007/s12274-016-1365-6

Nano Research 2017, 10(12): 4232每4244

Address correspondence to Y. Shirley Meng, shmeng@ucsd.edu; Mahsa Sina, msina@ucsd.edu

The conversion reaction voltage in the Li ion battery is reinterpreted based on the size of metal nanoparticles. A reversible CuF2 electrode is developed by coating with NiO.

    

Nanostructured organic electrode materials grown on graphene with covalent-bond interaction for high-rate and ultra-long-life lithium-ion batteries

Qing Zhao1, Jianbin Wang1, Chengcheng Chen1, Ting Ma1, and Jun Chen1,2 (*)

1 Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials Chemistry (Ministry of Education) and State Key Laboratory of Elemento-Organic Chemistry, College of Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071, China
2 Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071, China

DOI 10.1007/s12274-017-1580-9

Nano Research 2017, 10(12): 4245每4255

Address correspondence to chenabc@nankai.edu.cn

A nanostructured Li4C8H2O6/graphene composite exhibits a highrate capability and ultra-long cycling life in rechargeable Li-ion batteries. The improved conductivity, nanostructure morphology, and chemical-bond interaction between Li4C8H2O6 and graphene contribute to the superior electrochemical properties.

    

Garnet/polymer hybrid ion-conducting protective layer for stable lithium metal anode

Chunpeng Yang, Boyang Liu, Feng Jiang, Ying Zhang, Hua Xie, Emily Hitz, and Liangbing Hu (*)

Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742, USA

DOI 10.1007/s12274-017-1498-2

Nano Research 2017, 10(12): 4256每4265

Address correspondence to binghu@umd.edu

A Li-ion conducting hybrid film consisting of a garnet-type ion conductor and a polymer electrolyte is proposed as a protective layer for a Li metal anode. The hybrid ion-conducting layer allows Li deposition only underneath it and effectively suppresses Li dendrites, yielding Li metal anodes with excellent cycling stability.

    

Hydrogenated vanadium oxides as an advanced anode material in lithium ion batteries

Yufei Zhang1,2,3,∫, Huanwen Wang3,∫, Jun Yang2,3, Haosen Fan3, Yu Zhang3, Zhengfei Dai3, Yun Zheng3, Wei Huang2 (*), Xiaochen Dong2 (*), and Qingyu Yan3 (*)

1 College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Inner Mongolia University, Hohhot 010021, China
2 Key Laboratory of Flexible Electronics (KLOFE) & Institute of Advanced Materials (IAM), Jiangsu National Synergetic Innovation
Center for Advanced Materials (SICAM), Nanjing Tech University (NanjingTech), Nanjing 210009, China
3 School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 639798 Singapore
Yufei Zhang and Huanwen Wang contributed equally to this work.

DOI 10.1007/s12274-017-1582-7

Nano Research 2017, 10(12): 4266每4273

Address correspondence to Wei Huang, iamwhuang@njtech.edu.cn; Xiaochen Dong, iamxcdong@njtech.edu.cn; Qingyu Yan, alexyan@ntu.edu.sg

Hydrogenated vanadium oxide nanoneedles were prepared and show superior lithium storage properties, with a discharge capacity of 941 mA﹞h﹞g−1 at 100 mA﹞g−1 and a reversible capacity of ~285 mA﹞h﹞g−1 after 1,000 cycles at 5 A﹞g−1 when tested as the anode in a Li ion battery.

    

Walnut-inspired microsized porous silicon/graphene core每shell composites for high-performance lithium-ion battery anodes

Wei Zhai, Qing Ai, Lina Chen, Shiyuan Wei, Deping Li, Lin Zhang, Pengchao Si, Jinkui Feng (*), and Lijie Ci (*)

SDU & Rice Joint Center for Carbon Nanomaterials, Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution & Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061, China

DOI 10.1007/s12274-017-1584-5

Nano Research 2017, 10(12): 4274每4283

Address correspondence to Lijie Ci, lci@sdu.edu.cn; Jinkui Feng, jinkui@sdu.edu.cn

Microsized walnut-like porous silicon/reduced graphene oxide (P-Si/rGO) core每shell composites are prepared via in situ reduction followed by a dealloying process.

    

Water-soluble-template-derived nanoscale silicon nanoflake and nano-rod morphologies: Stable architectures for lithium-ion battery anodes

Bharat Gattu1, Prashanth Hanumantha Jampani3, Moni Kanchan Datta3,4, Ramalinga Kuruba3, and Prashant N. Kumta1,2,3,4 (*)

1 Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA
2 Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA
3 Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA
4 Center for Complex Engineered Multifunctional Materials (CCEMM), University of Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA

DOI 10.1007/s12274-017-1707-z

Nano Research 2017, 10(12): 4284每4297

Address correspondence to pkumta@pitt.edu

A water-soluble NaCl template facilitates the generation of Si nanostructures with different morphologies that show high capacities and stable performances as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries.

    

Embedding CoS2 nanoparticles in N-doped carbon nanotube hollow frameworks for enhanced lithium storage properties

Jintao Zhang, Le Yu (*), and Xiong Wen (David) Lou (*)

School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 62 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637459, Singapore

DOI 10.1007/s12274-016-1394-1

Nano Research 2017, 10(12): 4298每4304

Address correspondence to Xiong Wen (David) Lou, xwlou@ntu.edu.sg; Le Yu, yule0001@e.ntu.edu.sg

A novel hierarchical nanocomposite composed of CoS2 nanoparticles embedded in N-doped carbon nanotube frameworks was synthesized using a two-step metal-organic-framework-engaged strategy. Owing to its unique structural features and desirable chemical composition, the obtained nanocomposite exhibited enhanced electrochemical properties for use as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries.

    

Activated graphene with tailored pore structure parameters for long cycle-life lithium每sulfur batteries

Mingbo Zheng1, Songtao Zhang1, Shuangqiang Chen2, Zixia Lin1, Huan Pang1 (*), and Yan Yu2 (*)

1 School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225002, China
2 CAS Key Laboratory of Materials for Energy Conversion, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026, China

DOI 10.1007/s12274-017-1659-3

Nano Research 2017, 10(12): 4305每4317

Address correspondence to Huan Pang, huanpangchem@hotmail.com, panghuan@yzu.edu.cn; Yan Yu, yanyumse@ustc.edu.cn

The impregnation of sulfur into activated graphene is studied for lithium-sulfur battery cathodes. The influence of the pore structure parameters and sulfur loadings on battery performance is systematically investigated.

    

Free-standing porous carbon electrodes derived from wood for high-performance Li-O2 battery applications

Jingru Luo1,∫, Xiahui Yao1,∫, Lei Yang2,∫, Yang Han2, Liao Chen2, Xiumei Geng2, Vivek Vattipalli3, Qi Dong1, Wei Fan3, Dunwei Wang1 (*), Hongli Zhu2 (*)

1 Department of Chemistry, Merkert Chemistry Center, Boston College, 2609 Beacon St., Chestnut Hill, MA 02467 USA
2 Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Northeastern University, 360 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 USA
3 Chemical Engineering Department, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 686 N. Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA 01003 USA
Jingru Luo, Xiahui Yao and Lei Yang contributed equally to this work.

DOI 10.1007/s12274-017-1660-x

Nano Research 2017, 10(12): 4318每4326

Address correspondence to Dunwei Wang, dunwei.wang@bc.edu; Hongli Zhu, h.zhu@neu.edu

A free-standing wood-derived porous carbon was developed and successfully applied in Li-O2 batteries. The wood-derived carbon with its unique structure could potentially be a cost-effective porous electrode for mass production.

    

Mass and charge transport relevant to the formation of toroidal lithium peroxide nanoparticles in an aprotic lithium-oxygen battery: An experimental and theoretical modeling study

Xiangyi Luo1,∫, Rachid Amine2,3,∫, Kah Chun Lau2,4,∫, Jun Lu1 (*), Chun Zhan1, Larry A. Curtiss2, Said Al Hallaj3, Brian P. Chaplin3, and Khalil Amine1 (*)

1 Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL 60439, USA
2 Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL 60439, USA
3 Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, 810 S. Clinton, Chicago, IL 60607, USA
4 Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University Northridge, 18111 Nordhoff Street, Northridge, CA 91330, USA
These authors contributed equally to this work.

DOI 10.1007/s12274-017-1529-z

Nano Research 2017, 10(12): 4327每4336

Address correspondence to Jun Lu, junlu@anl.gov; Khalil Amine, amine@anl.gov

A selected snapshot of the atomic motion of a chemically bonded O2 species (red) when a Li2O2 cluster (yellow) is formed during the discharge process.

    

Cobalt phosphide nanoparticles embedded in nitrogendoped carbon nanosheets: Promising anode material with high rate capability and long cycle life for sodiumion batteries

Kai Zhang, Mihui Park, Jing Zhang, Gi-Hyeok Lee, Jeongyim Shin, and Yong-Mook Kang (*)

Department of Energy and Materials Engineering, Dongguk University-Seoul, Seoul 100-715, Republic of Korea

DOI 10.1007/s12274-017-1649-5

Nano Research 2017, 10(12): 4337每4350

Address correspondence to dake1234@dongguk.edu

Cobalt phosphide nanoparticles which were uniformly embedded in N-doped C nanosheets (CNSs) were prepared via the facile one-step calcination of a Co-based metal每organic framework (MOF) and red P, and the composite exhibited a high capacity, excellent rate performance, and a long cycle life. The outstanding performance of the composite is attributed to the P每C chemical interactions and highly conductive CNSs.

    

Aerosol synthesis of trivalent titanium doped titania/carbon composite microspheres with superior sodium storage performance

Doudou Guan1, Qiang Yu1, Chang Xu1, Chunjuan Tang1,2, Liang Zhou1 (*), Dongyuan Zhao1, and Liqiang Mai1,3 (*)

1 State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, International School of Materials Science and Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070, China
2 Department of Mathematics and Physics, Luoyang Institute of Science and Technology, Luoyang 471023, China
3 Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, United States

DOI 10.1007/s12274-017-1675-3

Nano Research 2017, 10(12): 4351每4359

Address correspondence to Liang Zhou, liangzhou@whut.edu.cn; Liqiang Mai, mlq518@whut.edu.cn

Trivalent titanium doped titania/carbon (TiO2每x/C) composite microspheres have been fabricated by a facile aerosol method. The obtained TiO2每x/C composite microspheres exhibit a high specific capacity (286 mA﹞h﹞g每1 at 50 mA﹞g每1) and excellent cycling stability (retaining 249 mA﹞h﹞g每1 after 180 cycles at 50 mA﹞g每1) in sodium storage.

    

2D sandwich-like nanosheets of ultrafine Sb nanoparticles anchored to graphene for high-efficiency sodium storage

Xiaowu Liu1, Man Gao1, Hai Yang1, Xiongwu Zhong1, and Yan Yu1,2,3 (*)

1 CAS Key Materials for Energy Conversion, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026, Anhui, China
2 Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials Chemistry (Ministry of Education), Nankai University, Tianjin 300071, China
3 State Key Laboratory of Fire Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026, Anhui, China

DOI 10.1007/s12274-017-1627-y

Nano Research 2017, 10(12): 4360每4367

Address correspondence to yanyumse@ustc.edu.cn

A sandwich-like Sb@graphene@Sb nanocomposite was fabricated through a facile reduction process and this composite delivers superior sodium storage properties.

    

Layered SnS sodium ion battery anodes synthesized near room temperature

Chuan Xia, Fan Zhang, Hanfeng Liang, and Husam N. Alshareef (*)

Materials Science and Engineering, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal 23955-6900, Saudi Arabia

DOI 10.1007/s12274-017-1722-0

Nano Research 2017, 10(12): 4368每4377

Address correspondence to husam.alshareef@kaust.edu.sa

Layered SnS nanosheets/carbon anodes were synthesized near room temperature using a simple one-step chemical bath deposition approach, followed by a solution-based carbon precursor coating and subsequent carbonization strategy. When used as sodium ion battery anodes, the as-prepared binder-free SnS/C electrodes showed excellent performance.

    

Utilizing the full capacity of carbon black as anode for Na-ion batteries via solvent co-intercalation

Wei Xiao1,2, Qian Sun1, Jian Liu1, Biwei Xiao1, Per-Anders Glans3, Jun Li2, Ruying Li1, Jinghua Guo3, Wanli Yang3, Tsun-Kong Sham2 (*), and Xueliang Sun1 (*)

1 Department of Mechanical & Materials Engineering, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A5B9, Canada
2 Department of Chemistry, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A5B7, Canada
3 Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720, USA

DOI 10.1007/s12274-017-1852-4

Nano Research 2017, 10(12): 4378每4387

Address correspondence to Xueliang Sun, xsun9@uwo.ca; Tsun-Kong Sham, tsham@uwo.ca

    

NaF每FeF2 nanocomposite: New type of Na-ion battery cathode material

Insang Hwang1, Sung-Kyun Jung1, Eun-Suk Jeong1, Hyunchul Kim2, Sung-Pyo Cho3, Kyojin Ku1, Hyungsub Kim1,4, Won-Sub Yoon2, and Kisuk Kang1,5 (*)

1 Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Research Institute of Advanced Materials (RIAM), Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, Republic of Korea
2 Department of Energy Science (DOES), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 16419, Republic of Korea
3 National Center for Inter-University Research Facilities, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, Republic of Korea
4 Neutron Science Division, HANARO, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 34057, Republic of Korea
5 Center for Nanoparticle Research, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, Republic of Korea

DOI 10.1007/s12274-017-1538-y

Nano Research 2017, 10(12): 4388每4397

Address correspondence to matlgen1@snu.ac.kr

A NaF每FeF2 nanocomposite is demonstrated to function successfully as a Na-ion battery cathode material.

    

Multifunctional SnO2/3D graphene hybrid materials for sodium-ion and lithium-ion batteries with excellent rate capability and long cycle life

Jung-In Lee1,∫, Junhua Song1,∫, Younghwan Cha1, Shaofang Fu1, Chengzhou Zhu1, Xiaolin Li2, Yuehe Lin1,3 (*), and Min-Kyu Song1 (*)

1 School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164, USA
2 Energy & Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352, USA
3 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352, USA
Jung-In Lee and Junhua Song contributed equally to this work.

DOI 10.1007/s12274-017-1756-3

Nano Research 2017, 10(12): 4398每4414

Address correspondence to Yuehe Lin, yuehe.lin@wsu.edu; Min-Kyu Song, minkyu.song@wsu.edu

Ultra-fine SnO2 nanocrystals anchored on the well-interconnected, three-dimensional (3D) macro-porous reduced graphene oxide (rGO) matrix showed outstanding performance as bifunctional electrodes for Li-ion and Na-ion batteries. Insights obtained from in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements combined with various electrochemical techniques suggested that the conductive, 3D porous rGO matrix has a more significant impact on Na-ion batteries.

    

A rapid solid-state synthesis of electrochemically active Chevrel phases (Mo6T8; T = S, Se) for rechargeable magnesium batteries

Partha Saha1,†, Prashanth H. Jampani1, Moni K. Datta1, Daeho Hong1, Bharat Gattu4, Prasad Patel4, Karan S. Kadakia4, Ayyakkannu Manivannan2, and Prashant N. Kumta1,3,4,5,6 (*)

1 Department of Bioengineering, Swanson School of Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA
2 U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV 26507, USA
3 Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Swanson School of Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA
4 Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Swanson School of Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA
5 School of Dental Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA
6 Center for Complex Engineered Multifunctional Materials, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA
Present address: Department of Ceramic Engineering, National Institute of Technology-Rourkela, Odisha-769008, Ind

DOI 10.1007/s12274-017-1695-z

Nano Research 2017, 10(12): 4415每4435

Address correspondence to pkumta@pitt.edu

Cu2Mo6T8 (T = S, Se) is synthesized for the first time by high energy mechanical milling (HEMM). 30 min HEMM (CuT + Mo + MoT2) with 30 min heat treatment at ~1,100 K yields the electrochemically active Chevrel phase.

    

Iron-chelated hydrogel-derived bifunctional oxygen electrocatalyst for high-performance rechargeable Zn-air batteries

Fanlu Meng1,2, Haixia Zhong1,3, Junmin Yan2 (*), and Xinbo Zhang1 (*)

1 State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022, China
2 Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials, Ministry of Education and College of Materials Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012, China
3 University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China

DOI 10.1007/s12274-016-1343-z

Nano Research 2017, 10(12): 4436每4447

Address correspondence to Xinbo Zhang, xbzhang@ciac.ac.cn; Junmin Yan, junminyan@jlu.edu.cn

A bifunctional oxygen electrocatalyst (C-Fe-UFR) derived from a novel iron-chelated urea-formaldehyde resin hydrogel exhibits great catalytic activity and durability towards oxygen reduction (ORR) and evolution (OER) reactions, especially, when used as air electrodes in rechargeable Zn-air batteries, high power density and perfect cycling stability are achieved.

    

Improved flexible Li-ion hybrid capacitors: Techniques for superior stability

Shengyang Dong1,2, Hongsen Li1, Junjun Wang1, Xiaogang Zhang1 (*), and Xiulei Ji2 (*)

1 Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Materials and Technology for Energy Conversion, College of Material Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016, China
2 Department of Chemistry, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331-4003, USA

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-017-1753-6

Nano Research 2017, 10(12): 4448每4456

Address correspondence to Xiaogang Zhang, azhangxg@nuaa.edu.cn; Xiulei Ji, david.ji@oregonstate.edu

A novel flexible Li-ion capacitor (LIC) was designed by integrating an anode comprising three-dimensional (3D)-flexible Li4Ti5O12 nanoplate arrays coated on carbon textile and a cathode comprising N-doped graphene/carbon-nanotube composite films. Benefiting from the novel electrode architectures and hybrid energy-storage mechanisms, the flexible LIC delivers excellent mechanical flexibility, high energy density, high power density, and long capacity retention.

    

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