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Structural, optical, and electrical properties of phase-controlled cesium lead iodide nanowires

Minliang Lai1, Qiao Kong1, Connor G. Bischak1, Yi Yu1,2, Letian Dou1,2, Samuel W. Eaton1, Naomi S. Ginsberg1,2,3,4,5, and Peidong Yang1,2,3,6 (*)

1 Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA
2 Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720, USA
3 Kavli Energy Nanosciences Institute, Berkeley, California 94720, USA
4 Molecular Biophysics and Integrative Bioimaging Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, alifornia 94720, USA
5 Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA
6 Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA

DOI 10.1007/s12274-016-1415-0

Nano Research 2017, 10(4): 1107每1114

Address correspondence to p_yang@berkeley.edu

CsPbI3 nanowires undergo a structural phase transition from the yellow non-perovskite phase to the black perovskite phase during rapid thermal quenching. Perovskite phase CsPbI3 nanowires exhibited good optoelectronic properties for photovoltaic applications.

    

Dialectics of nature: Temporal and spatial regulation in material sciences

Jianlong Xia1 and Lei Jiang2 (*)

1 School of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Life Science, State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, No. 122 Luoshi Road, Wuhan 430070, China
2 Laboratory of Bioinspired Smart Interfacial Science, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China

DOI 10.1007/s12274-017-1479-5

Nano Research 2017, 10(4): 1115每1124

Address correspondence to jianglei@iccas.ac.cn

Temporal and spatial regulation has received significant attention in modern material sciences. Here, we highlight recent advances in the temporal regulation of organic semiconductors and spatial regulation of nanocrystals.

    

Surface modification of nanozymes

Biwu Liu and Juewen Liu (*)

Department of Chemistry, Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1, Canada

 

DOI 10.1007/s12274-017-1426-5

Nano Research 2017, 10(4): 1125每1148

Address correspondence to liujw@uwaterloo.ca

The enzyme-like activities of nanomaterials (nanozymes) can be tuned by controlling the surface chemistry with various modification strategies. Progress over the last several years is summarized.

    

One-pot/three-step synthesis of zinc-blende CdSe/CdS core/shell nanocrystals with thick shells

Yuan Niu, Chaodan Pu, Runchen Lai, Renyang Meng, Wanzhen Lin, Haiyan Qin, and Xiaogang Peng (*)

Center for Chemistry of Novel and High-Performance Materials, and Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, China
These authors contributed equally to this work.

DOI 10.1007/s12274-016-1287-3

Nano Research 2017, 10(4): 1149每1162

Address correspondence to xpeng@zju.edu.cn

An optimized, systematic synthetic scheme for fabricating zinc-blende CdSe/CdS core/shell nanocrystals with thick shells was successfully developed.

    

High-performance oxygen reduction and evolution carbon catalysis: From mechanistic studies to device integration

John W. F. To1,∫, Jia Wei Desmond Ng1,2,∫, Samira Siahrostami1,∫, Ai Leen Koh3, Yangjin Lee4, Zhihua Chen1, Kara D. Fong1, Shucheng Chen1, Jiajun He5, Won-Gyu Bae1, Jennifer Wilcox5, Hu Young Jeong6, Kwanpyo Kim4, Felix Studt7,8,9 (*), Jens K. Nørskov1,7 (*), Thomas F. Jaramillo1 (*), and Zhenan Bao1 (*)

1 Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
2 Institute of Chemical and Engineering Sciences, Agency for Science, Technology and Research, Jurong Island 627833, Singapore
3 Stanford Nano Shared Facilities, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
4 Department of Physics, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 689-798, Republic of Korea
5 Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401, USA
6 UNIST Central Research Facilities (UCRF), Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 689- 98, Republic of Korea
7 SUNCAT Center for Interface Science and Catalysis SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025, USA
8 Institute of Catalysis Research and Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany
9 Institute for Chemical Technology and Polymer Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Engesserstr. 18, 76131 Karlsruhe, Germany
These authors contributed equally to this work.

 

DOI 10.1007/s12274-016-1347-8

Nano Research 2017, 10(4): 1163每1177

Address correspondence to Felix Studt, felix.studt@kit.edu; Jens K. Nørskov, norskov@stanford.edu; Thomas F. Jaramillo, jaramillo@stanford.edu; Zhenan Bao, zbao@stanford.edu

The development of high-performance and low-cost oxygen reduction and evolution catalysts that can be easily integrated into existing devices is crucial for the wide deployment of energy storage systems that utilize O2-H2O chemistries, such as regenerative fuel cells and metal-air batteries. Herein, we report an NH3-activated N-doped hierarchical carbon catalyst that exhibits good performance for both the oxygen reduction reaction and the oxygen evolution reaction, as demonstrated by means of electrochemical studies of its integration into the oxygen electrode of a regenerative fuel cell, and through theoretical calculation using density functional theory.

    

Defect-rich MoS2 nanowall catalyst for efficient hydrogen evolution reaction

Junfeng Xie1,2 (*), Haichao Qu1, Jianping Xin1, Xinxia Zhang1, Guanwei Cui1, Xiaodong Zhang2, Jian Bao2, Bo Tang1, and Yi Xie2 (*)

1 College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Collaborative Innovation Center of Functionalized Probes for Chemical Imaging in Universities of Shandong, Key Laboratory of Molecular and Nano Probes, Ministry of Education, Institute of Molecular and Nano Science, Shandong Normal University, Jinan 250014, China
2 Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale, Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026, China

DOI 10.1007/s12274-017-1421-x

Nano Research 2017, 10(4): 1178每1188

Address correspondence to Junfeng Xie, xiejf@sdnu.edu.cn; Yi Xie, yxie@ustc.edu.cn

    

Rapid growth of angle-confined large-domain graphene bicrystals

Huaying Ren1,2, Huan Wang1, Li Lin1, Miao Tang1, Shuli Zhao1, Bing Deng1, Manish Kumar Priydarshi1, Jincan Zhang1,2, Hailin Peng1 (*), and Zhongfan Liu1 (*)

1 Center for Nanochemistry, Beijing Science and Engineering Center for Nanocarbons, Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China
2 Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China

DOI 10.1007/s12274-017-1534-2

Nano Research 2017, 10(4): 1189每1199

Address correspondence to Zhongfan Liu, zfliu@pku.edu.cn; Hailin Peng, hlpeng@pku.edu.cn

We develop a facile graphene-misorientation strategy to obtain angle-confined graphene bicrystals that contain only two lattice orientations with a tilt angle of 30∼. The size of each graphene domain before coalescence is tuned from sub-centimeter (6 mm) to micrometer size using an efficient cooperative passivation strategy with a high growth rate.

    

Liposomes co-loaded with metformin and chlorin e6 modulate tumor hypoxia during enhanced photodynamic therapy

Xuejiao Song, Liangzhu Feng, Chao Liang, Min Gao, Guosheng Song, and Zhuang Liu (*)

Institute of Functional Nano & Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials & Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123, China

 

DOI 10.1007/s12274-016-1274-8

Nano Research 2017, 10(4): 1200每1212

Address correspondence to zliu828@gmail.com, zliu@suda.edu.cn

Tumor oxygenation, measured by in vivo photoacoustic imaging and ex vivo immunofluorescence staining, was markedly improved by the intravenous administration of liposomes co-loaded with the photosensitizer hydrophobic chlorin e6 and the diabetes drug, metformin. Subsequently, the therapeutic efficacy of in vivo photodynamic treatment using the liposomes was shown to be superior to that of conventional photodynamic therapy without metformin.

    

A Prussian blue route to nitrogen-doped graphene aerogels as efficient electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction with enhanced active site accessibility

Yayuan Liu1, Haotian Wang2, Dingchang Lin1, Jie Zhao1, Chong Liu1, Jin Xie1, and Yi Cui1,3 (*)

1 Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
2 Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
3 Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025, USA

DOI 10.1007/s12274-016-1300-x

Nano Research 2017, 10(4): 1213每1222

Address correspondence to yicui@stanford.edu

We report the rational design of a catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction with highly active catalytic centers and enhanced active site accessibility. The catalyst was obtained via a facile Prussian blue nanoparticle approach and displayed outstanding catalytic activity on par with the state-of-the-art Pt/C catalyst at the same mass loading in alkaline media, good performance in acidic media, and excellent stability and crossover tolerance.

    

Chemical vapor deposition growth of single-crystalline cesium lead halide microplatelets and heterostructures for optoelectronic applications

Yiliu Wang1, Xun Guan2,3, Dehui Li1, Hung-Chieh Cheng4, Xidong Duan2 (*), Zhaoyang Lin1, and Xiangfeng Duan1,5 (*)

1 Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
2 State Key Laboratory for Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082, China
3 School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083, China
4 Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
5 California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA

DOI 10.1007/s12274-016-1317-1

Nano Research 2017, 10(4): 1223每1233

Address correspondence to Xidong Duan, xidongduan@hnu.edu.cn; Xiangfeng Duan, xduan@chem.ucla.edu

A chemical vapor deposition approach is used to grow all-inorganic cesium lead halide perovskite microplatelets and heterostructures with tunable optical and electronic properties for optoelectronic applications.

    

Safety profile of two-dimensional Pd nanosheets for photothermal therapy and photoacoustic imaging

Mei Chen1,∫, Shuzhen Chen2,3,∫, Chengyong He2,∫, Shiguang Mo1, Xiaoyong Wang2, Gang Liu2 (*), and Nanfeng Zheng1 (*)

1 State Key Laboratory for Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces, Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemistry for Energy Materials, and Engineering Research Center for Nano-Preparation Technology of Fujian Province, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005, China
2 State Key Laboratory of Molecular Vaccinology and Molecular Diagnostics, Center for Molecular Imaging and Translational Medicine, School of Public Health, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005, China
3 Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Xiamen Medical College, Xiamen 361008, China
These authors contributed equally to this work.

DOI 10.1007/s12274-016-1349-6

Nano Research 2017, 10(4): 1234每1248

Address correspondence to Nanfeng Zheng, nfzheng@xmu.edu.cn; Gang Liu, gangliu.cmitm@xmu.edu.cn

In vitro and in vivo biological behaviors of ultrathin two-dimensional (2D) Pd nanosheets with diameters ranging from 5 to 80 nm were systemically studied, including their photothermal and photoacoustic effects, pharmacokinetics, and toxicity.

    

Ligand effects on electronic and optoelectronic properties of two-dimensional PbS necking percolative superlattices

Man Zhao1,∫, Defang Ding1,∫, Fangxu Yang3, Dawei Wang1, Jiawei Lv1, Wenping Hu3, Chenguang Lu1,2 (*), and Zhiyong Tang1,2 (*)

1 CAS Key Laboratory of Nanosystem and Hierarchical Fabrication, CAS Center for Excellence in Nanoscience, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, Beijing 100190, China
2 University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19 A Yuquan Rd, Shijingshan District, Beijing 100049, China
3 Key Laboratory of Molecular Optoelectronic Sciences, School of Science, Tianjin University & Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering, Tianjin 300072, China
These authors contributed equally to this work.

DOI 10.1007/s12274-016-1351-z

Nano Research 2017, 10(4): 1249每1257

Address correspondence to Zhiyong Tang, zytang@nanoctr.cn; Chenguang Lu, lucg@nanoctr.cn

A unique PbS structure with necking percolative superlattices was used to study the effects of ligands on the electronic and optoelectronic properties of nanocrystal (NC) solids in order to elucidate the relationship between the NC surface and the properties.

    

Organic-acid-assisted synthesis of a 3D lasagna-like Fe-N-doped CNTs-G framework: An efficient and stable electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reactions

Xiaobing Bao, Yutong Gong, Jiang Deng, Shiping Wang, and Yong Wang (*)

Advanced Materials and Catalysis Group, ZJU-NHU United R&D Center, Center for Chemistry of High-Performance and Novel Materials, Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310028, China
These authors contributed equally to this work.

DOI 10.1007/s12274-016-1374-5

Nano Research 2017, 10(4): 1258每1267

Address correspondence to chemwy@zju.edu.cn

An easily operated, oxalic acid-assisted method was developed for the in-situ fabrication of a three-dimensional (3D) lasagna-like Fe-N-doped carbon nanotubes and graphene hybrid (CNTs-G) framework from a precursor designed at the molecular level. The impressive oxygen reduction reaction performances in both alkaline and acidic conditions confirm the catalytic significance of this technically favorable morphological structure. This work further advances the construction of novel 3D carbon architectures via practical and economic routes.

    

Understanding of the capacity contribution of carbon in phosphorus-carbon composites for high-performance anodes in lithium ion batteries

Jiantie Xu1,3,∫, In-Yup Jeon2,∫, Jianmin Ma1, Yuhai Dou1, Seok-Jin Kim2, Jeong-Min Seo2, Huakun Liu1, Shixue Dou1 (*), Jong-Beom Baek2 (*), and Liming Dai3 (*)

1 Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia
2 School of Energy and Chemical Engineering/Low-Dimensional Carbon Materials Center, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), UNIST-gil 50, Ulsan 689-897, Republic of Korea
3 Department of Macromolecular Science and Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA
These authors contributed equally to this work.

 

DOI 10.1007/s12274-016-1383-4

Nano Research 2017, 10(4): 1268每1281

Address correspondence to Shixue Dou, dou@uow.edu.au; Jong Beom Baek, jbbaek@unist.ac.kr; Liming Dai, liming.dai@case.edu

Ball-milling graphite in the presence of red P was demonstrated to produce a series of P-C composites. The capacity contributions from P and C in the P-C composites were discussed.

    

Significantly enhanced optoelectronic performance of tungsten diselenide phototransistor via surface functionalization

Bo Lei1,2,∫, Zehua Hu1,2,∫, Du Xiang2,3, Junyong Wang1,2, Goki Eda1,2,3, Cheng Han2,3,4 (*), and Wei Chen1,2,3,4,5 (*)

1 Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542, Singapore
2 Centre for Advanced 2D Materials and Graphene Research Centre, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117546, Singapore
3 Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117543, Singapore
4 SZU-NUS Collaborative Innovation Center for Optoelectronic Science and Technology, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060, China
5 National University of Singapore (Suzhou) Research Institute, 377 Lin Quan Street, Suzhou Industrial Park, Suzhou 215123, China
These authors contributed equally to these work.

 

DOI 10.1007/s12274-016-1386-1

Nano Research 2017, 10(4): 1282每1291

Address correspondence to Wei Chen, phycw@nus.edu.sg; Cheng Han, chmhanc@nus.edu.sg

This article demonstrates the significant enhancement in the optoelectronic performance of WSe2 phototransistors, via in situ surface functionalization with cesium carbonate. The electron mobility of WSe2 was increased by nearly one order of magnitude, while the photoresponsivity and the external quantum efficiency (EQE) were enhanced by almost three orders of magnitude after Cs2CO3 modification.

    

Enhanced optical absorption in semiconductor nanoparticles enabled by nearfield dielectric scattering

Kowsalya D. Rasamani1, Jonathan J. Foley IV2, Brittney Beidelman1,3, and Yugang Sun1 (*)

1 Department of Chemistry, Temple University, 1901 North 13th Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19122, USA
2 Department of Chemistry, William Paterson University, 300 Pompton Road, Wayne, New Jersey 07470, USA
3 Department of Physics, Bryn Mawr College, 101 North Merion Avenue, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 19010, USA

DOI 10.1007/s12274-016-1406-1

Nano Research 2017, 10(4): 1292每1301

Address correspondence to ygsun@temple.edu

An increased absorption cross section in semiconductor AgBr nanoparticles is achieved by placing them on dielectric SiO2 nanospheres that generate enhanced scattering nearfields.

    

Enhancing both selectivity and coking-resistance of a single-atom Pd1/C3N4 catalyst for acetylene hydrogenation

Xiaohui Huang1,∫, Yujia Xia1,∫, Yuanjie Cao2, Xusheng Zheng2, Haibin Pan2, Junfa Zhu2, Chao Ma3, Hengwei Wang1, Junjie Li1, Rui You1, Shiqiang Wei2, Weixin Huang1,3, and Junling Lu1 (*)

1 Department of Chemical Physics, iChEM, CAS Key Laboratory of Materials for Energy Conversion, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026, China
2 National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230029, China
3 Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026, China
These authors contributed equally to this work.

DOI 10.1007/s12274-016-1416-z

Nano Research 2017, 10(4): 1302每1312

Address correspondence to junling@ustc.edu.cn

A single-atom Pd1/C3N4 catalyst showed a remarkably high ethylene selectivity and excellent durability by effectively suppressing coke formation during selective hydrogenation of acetylene in excess ethylene.

    

MoS2 as a long-life host material for potassium ion intercalation

Xiaodi Ren, Qiang Zhao, William D. McCulloch, and Yiying Wu (*)

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The Ohio State University, 151 W Woodruff Ave, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
Present address: College of Chemical Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065, China

DOI 10.1007/s12274-016-1419-9

Nano Research 2017, 10(4): 1313每1321

Address correspondence to wu@chemistry.ohio-state.edu

The electrochemical K+ intercalation process in MoS2 is shown in this study. MoS2 has a long life for repetitive K+ intercalation and de-intercalation.

    

Wet-chemistry synthesis of cobalt carbide nanoparticles as highly active and stable electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution reaction

Siwei Li1,∫, Ce Yang1,∫, Zhen Yin1,2,∫, Hanjun Yang1, Yifu Chen1, Lili Lin1, Mengzhu Li1, Weizhen Li1, Gang Hu3, and Ding Ma1 (*)

1 College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China
2 State Key Laboratory of Separation Membranes and Membrane Processes, Department of Chemical Engineering, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300387, China
3 Israel Chemicals Limited, Shanghai 200021, China
These authors contributed equally to this work.

DOI 10.1007/s12274-017-1425-6

Nano Research 2017, 10(4): 1322每1328

Address correspondence to dma@pku.edu.cn

We developed a bromide-induced wet-chemistry synthesis method for Co2C nanoparticles, which were a highly active and stable electrocatalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction.

    

Green light-emitting diodes based on hybrid perovskite films with mixed cesium and methylammonium cations

Junjie Si1, Yang Liu1, Nana Wang2, Meng Xu2, Jing Li3, Haiping He3 (*), Jianpu Wang2 (*), and Yizheng Jin4 (*)

1 State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Center for Chemistry of High-Performance & Novel Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, China
2 Key Laboratory of Flexible Electronics (KLOFE) & Institute of Advanced Materials (IAM), Jiangsu National Synergetic Innovation Center for Advanced Materials (SICAM), Nanjing Tech University (NanjingTech), 30 South Puzhu Road, Nanjing 211816, China
3 State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, China
4 Center for Chemistry of High-Performance & Novel Materials, State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, China

DOI 10.1007/s12274-017-1432-7

Nano Research 2017, 10(4): 1329每1335

Address correspondence to Haiping He, hphe@zju.edu.cn; Jianpu Wang, iamjpwang@njtech.edu.cn; Yizheng Jin, yizhengjin@zju.edu.cn

Partially replacing the organic methylammonium cations by inorganic Cs+ results in perovskite thin films that provide nearly full surface coverage and much higher photoluminescence quantum efficiency due to the greater radiative recombination rate and the smaller nonradiative recombination rate. These films are therefore ideal for electroluminescence applications.

    

Realization of vertical and lateral van der Waals heterojunctions using two-dimensional layered organic semiconductors

Yuhan Zhang1,∫, Zhongzhong Luo1,∫, Fengrui Hu2, Haiyan Nan3, Xiaoyong Wang2, Zhenhua Ni3, Jianbin Xu4,1, Yi Shi1 (*), and Xinran Wang1 (*)

1 National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, School of Electronic Science and Engineering, and Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093, China
2 School of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093, China
3 Department of Physics, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189, China
4 Department of Electronic Engineering and Materials Science and Technology Research Center, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China
These authors contributed equally to this work.

DOI 10.1007/s12274-017-1442-5

Nano Research 2017, 10(4): 1336每1344

Address correspondence to Xinran Wang, xrwang@nju.edu.cn; Yi Shi, yshi@nju.edu.cn

Using dioctylbenzothienobenzothiophene (C8-BTBT) and pentacene as building blocks, two-dimensional vertical and lateral molecular van der Waals heterojunctions with clean and sharp interfaces are prepared via a highly controllable physical vapor transport (PVT) process.

    

Near-infrared (NIR) controlled reversible cell adhesion on a responsive nano-biointerface

Haijun Cui1,2, Pengchao Zhang2,3, Wenshuo Wang1,2, Guannan Li2,3, Yuwei Hao2,3, Luying Wang2,3, and Shutao Wang1,2 (*)

1 CAS Key Laboratory of Bio-inspired Materials and Interfacial Science, CAS Center for Excellence in Nanoscience, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing 100190, China
2 University of Chinese Academy of Sciences (UCAS), Beijing 100049, China
3 Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China

DOI 10.1007/s12274-017-1446-1

Nano Research 2017, 10(4): 1345每1355

Address correspondence to stwang@mail.ipc.ac.cn

    

A carbon-based 3D current collector with surface protection for Li metal anode

Ying Zhang1,∫, Boyang Liu1,∫, Emily Hitz1, Wei Luo1, Yonggang Yao1, Yiju Li1, Jiaqi Dai1, Chaoji Chen1, Yanbin Wang1, Chunpeng Yang1, Hongbian Li2, and Liangbing Hu1 (*)

1 Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA
2 National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, Beijing 100190, China
These authors contributed equally to this work.

DOI 10.1007/s12274-017-1461-2

Nano Research 2017, 10(4): 1356每1365

Address correspondence to binghu@umd.edu

The stability of Li@atomic layer deposition (ALD)-carbon nanotube sponge (CNTS) electrodes relies on both the high-surface-area conductive framework and the robust ALD-Al2O3 surface protection layer, which decreases the effective areal current density and stabilizes the electrode/electrolyte interface for Li nuclei, respectively.

    

Targeting orthotopic gliomas with renal-clearable luminescent gold nanoparticles

Chuanqi Peng1, Xiaofei Gao2, Jing Xu1, Bujie Du1, Xuhui Ning1, Shaoheng Tang1, Robert M. Bachoo3, Mengxiao Yu1, Woo-Ping Ge2 (*), and Jie Zheng1 (*)

1 Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX 75080, USA
2 Children*s Research Institute, Department of Pediatrics, Department of Neuroscience, Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390, USA
3 Simmons Cancer Center, Annette G. Strauss Center for Neuro-Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Department of Neurology and Neurotherapeutics, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390, USA

DOI 10.1007/s12274-017-1472-z

Nano Research 2017, 10(4): 1366每1376

Address correspondence to Jie Zheng, jiezheng@utdallas.edu; Woo-Ping Ge, woo-ping.ge@utsouthwestern.edu

Renal-clearable gold nanoparticles can effectively target gliomas, the most common brain tumors, which generally exhibit poor permeability, through the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect.

    

Multi-node CdS hetero-nanowires grown with defect-rich oxygen-doped MoS2 ultrathin nanosheets for efficient visible-light photocatalytic H2 evolution

Haifeng Lin1, Yanyan Li2, Haoyi Li1, and Xun Wang1 (*)

1 Key Lab of Organic Optoelectronics and Molecular Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China
2 Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials Chemistry and Physics, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002, China

DOI 10.1007/s12274-017-1497-3

Nano Research 2017, 10(4): 1377每1392

Address correspondence to wangxun@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn

Without using noble metals as co-catalysts, multi-node CdS hetero-nanowires (NWs) were grown with defect-rich O-incorporated MoS2 ultrathin nanosheets (NSs). The hetero-NWs exhibited abundant catalytic active sites, substantially improved electric conductivity, and significantly enhanced separation of charge carriers, resulting in superior visible-light photocatalytic properties compared with Pt/CdS NWs, pure CdS NWs, and MoS2 NSs, as well as their physical mixtures.

    

Ultrasound-triggered noninvasive regulation of blood glucose levels using microgels integrated with insulin nanocapsules

Jin Di1,2,∫, Jicheng Yu1,2,∫, Qun Wang3, Shanshan Yao4, Dingjie Suo4, Yanqi Ye1,2, Matthew Pless4, Yong Zhu4, Yun Jing4 (*), and Zhen Gu1,2,5 (*)

1 Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA
2 Center for Nanotechnology in Drug Delivery and Division of Molecular Pharmaceutics, UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
3 Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011, USA
4 Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA
5 Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
These authors contributed equally to this work.

DOI 10.1007/s12274-017-1500-z

Nano Research 2017, 10(4): 1393每1402

Address correspondence to Zhen Gu, zgu@email.unc.edu; Ying Yun, yjing2@ncsu.edu

An injectable microgel formulation was developed by integrating a chitosan-based microgel with poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) based nanocapsules loaded with insulin for focused ultrasound (FUS)-triggered noninvasive regulation of blood glucose levels.

    

Facile synthesis of fully ordered L10-FePt nanoparticles with controlled Pt-shell thicknesses for electrocatalysis

Yonghoon Hong1, Hee Jin Kim2, Daehee Yang1, Gaehang Lee3, Ki Min Nam4, Myung-Hwa Jung5, Young-Min Kim6,7 (*), Sang-Il Choi2 (*), and Won Seok Seo1 (*)

1 Department of Chemistry, Sogang University, Seoul 04107, Republic of Korea
2 Department of Chemistry and Green-Nano Materials Research Center, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 41566, Republic of Korea
3 Korea Basic Science Institute and University of Science and Technology, Daejeon 34133, Republic of Korea
4 Department of Chemistry, Mokpo National University, Jeonnam 58554, Republic of Korea
5 Department of Physics, Sogang University, Seoul 04107, Republic of Korea
6 Center for Integrated Nanostructure Physics, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Suwon 16419, Republic of Korea
7 Department of Energy Science, Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU), Suwon 16419, Republic of Korea

DOI 10.1007/s12274-017-1495-5

Nano Research 2017, 10(8): 2866每2880

Address correspondence to Young-Min Kim, youngmk@skku.edu; Sang-Il Choi, sichoi@knu.ac.kr; Won Seok Seo, wsseo@sogang.ac.kr

We controlled the Pt-shell thickness of fully L10-ordered face-centered tetragonal (fct) FePt nanoparticles (NPs) by using several acids with different acid strengths for surface-Fe etching and studied the effects of both surface-Fe etching and Pt-shell thickness on the electrocatalytic properties of fct-FePt NPs for the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR).

    

Catalysis under shell: Improved CO oxidation reaction confined in Pt@h-BN core每shell nanoreactors

Mengmeng Sun1, Qiang Fu1 (*), Lijun Gao1,2, Yanping Zheng3, Yangyang Li3, Mingshu Chen3, and Xinhe Bao1

1 State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, iChEM, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023, China
2 Department of Chemical Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026, China
3 State Key Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces, Department of Chemistry, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005, China

DOI 10.1007/s12274-017-1512-8

Nano Research 2017, 10(4): 1403每1412

Address correspondence to qfu@dicp.ac.cn

Pt@hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) core-shell nanostructures function as nanoreactors, in which CO oxidation reactions with improved activity, selectivity, and stability occur at the core-shell interfaces. The confinement effect exerted by the h-BN shells promotes the Pt-catalyzed reactions.

    

Moisture-driven phase transition for improved perovskite solar cells with reduced trap-state density

Swaminathan Venkatesan1, Fang Hao1, Junyoung Kim1, Yaoguang Rong1, Zhuan Zhu1, Yanliang Liang1, Jiming Bao1, and Yan Yao1,2 (*)

1 Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204, USA
2 Texas Center for Superconductivity at the University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204, USA

DOI 10.1007/s12274-017-1515-5

Nano Research 2017, 10(4): 1413每1422

Address correspondence to yyao4@uh.edu

The moisture-enabled phase transition of a precursor intermediate to the perovskite phase for enhancing the photovoltaic efficiency is demonstrated. The moisture assists in decoupling the conversion and grain growth to enable the formation of active-layer films with a low defect density.

    

Background-free three-dimensional selective imaging of anisotropic plasmonic nanoparticles

Xiaodong Cheng1,3, Xuan Cao1, Bin Xiong1, Yan He1,2 (*), and Edward S. Yeung1

1 State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, College of Biology, Hunan University, Changsha 410082, China
2 Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China
3 School of Medical Lab Science and Life Science, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou 325035, China

DOI 10.1007/s12274-017-1524-4

Nano Research 2017, 10(4): 1423每1433

Address correspondence to yanhe2021@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn

Three-dimensional plasmonic imaging of the gold-nanorod distribution inside cells with a high resolution and high contrast was achieved via orientation-dependent localization microscopy

    

Controlled growth and photoconductive properties of hexagonal SnS2 nanoflakes with mesa-shaped atomic steps

Yi Hu1, Tao Chen1, Xiaoqi Wang1, Lianbo Ma1, Renpeng Chen1, Hongfei Zhu1, Xin Yuan1, Changzeng Yan1, Guoyin Zhu1, Hongling Lv1, Jia Liang1, Zhong Jin1 (*), and Jie Liu1,2 (*)

1 Key Laboratory of Mesoscopic Chemistry of MOE and Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemistry for Life Sciences, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093, China
2 Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA

DOI 10.1007/s12274-017-1525-3

Nano Research 2017, 10(4): 1434每1447

Address correspondence to Zhong Jin, zhongjin@nju.edu.cn; Jie Liu, j.liu@duke.edu

We demonstrate the controlled growth of two-dimensional (2D) hexagonal tin disulfide (SnS2) nanoflakes with stacked monolayer atomic steps.

    

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